Talent Aquisition in 2019: Internal Promotions

According to an article found in Deloitte Insights, many companies in 2019 are placing more emphasis on hiring within their organization first. According to the writers hiring within has historically not been the route taken by most companies. However, due to the shortage of qualified recruits business’s are starting to see the value in gleaning talent from their existing employee pool. Of course, this is good business sense. Return on Investment for training current employees would be high because they already have a strong knowledge base of how the business operates.

Pros to promoting internally:

  • Your current employees know the culture of the company.
  • Save time and cost on hiring campaigns.
  • Provides an incentive for current company talent.


As talent markets get tighter and the world becomes more connected, a major new trend has emerged from our research: the need to improve internal talent mobility to more effectively move people among jobs, projects, and geographies. This year, internal talent mobility has become a C-suite-level topic, with 76 percent of our survey respondents rating it important and 20 percent rating it one of their organization’s three most urgent issues.



Erica VoliniJeff SchwartzIndranil RoyMaren HauptmannYves Van Durme,Brad DennyJosh Bersin : Talent Mobility: Winning the war on the home front[Web log post]. Retrieved May 9, 2019, from
https://www2.deloitte.com/insights/us/en/focus/human-capital-trends/2019/internal-talent-mobility.html

This quote from Claudette Dunlap further highlights the shortage of available candidates. She places emphasis on the fact that there are more jobs available than there are people to fill them.

With more job openings than people to fill them, recruiters have a long road in 2019 to combat the effects of a tight labor market. Not only do recruiters need to overcome the lack of candidates to fill positions, but they will also need to find creative ways to overcome any skills gaps that exist. Finding ways to offer training or career development represents a significant opportunity for differentiation.

Claudette Dunlap, Director of National Sales at TempWorks Software

If you have the existing talent within your organization it makes complete sense to build on their existing skill set. Not only are you creating growth opportunity for your employees but you are also retaining employees during this tight labor market.


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Tips to Successfully Interview for a Job Promotion

Job Promotion

Great article sharing how you can prepare for your job promotion interview, what to do and say during the interview and what to do after your interview.  Best of luck out there!

Original article click here.

Are you being considered for a promotion, but have to interview to get considered for the new job? What’s the best way to handle an interview for a job promotion? What can you expect when you’re interviewing with a company you already work at? How can you ace the interview and get promoted?

What is a Job Promotion Interview?

A job promotion interview is an interview for a promotion or a different job at your current employer.

Many companies require internal candidates to go through a similar hiring process as external candidates for employment.

A job promotion interview is different from a job interview for a new position for several reasons. First, you are already part of the company, and you know what their expectations are. Secondly, every day – before and after the interview – will give you an opportunity to show off your abilities while working in your current position.

In addition, you can use your already established commitment to the company, and your aspirations to grow within it, to your benefit. On the flip side, you still need to go through an interview process and will be compared with other candidates for the job, possibly external as well as internal candidates. In fact, your interview may be tougher than candidates from outside the company, because expectations about what you know and your skills may be higher.

Job Promotion Application Requirements

When applying for a promotion or a lateral job change within the company, employees are expected to apply and interview for the position per company guidelines. Even though you’re already employed at the company, don’t be surprised if you have to resubmit your resume and craft a cover letter for the new position.

In fact, submitting a custom cover letter specific to the new position can be very helpful in landing the job.

Remember, you may be competing with outside candidates, and although you have an advantage in that you already work for the company, that doesn’t mean you should skimp on your job application efforts. Take the time to carefully review and proofread your application materials before you submit them.

Tips to Successfully Interview for a Job Promotion

Here are tips for acing a job promotion interview, so you can be prepared for an opportunity to move up the career ladder.

Before the Job Promotion Interview

Pay Attention to the Hiring Process. When you find out there is a job opportunity you’re interested in, follow the application instructions. Don’t expect to be able to bypass the company’s hiring process to get the job. If the company has rules, they apply.

Prepare for the Interview. Review common interview questions and answers and consider how you would respond, based on your knowledge of the company, your current job and the new position, your skills, and your goals for the future. Review the skills you have that make you qualified for the new job. Also, review typical job promotion interview questions that you may be asked.

Do Your Job Well. Even though you may be moving on, continue to do your current job well, to remind your superiors about what a great employee you are.

Tell Your Boss. If you get selected for an interview, tell your current supervisor so he or she doesn’t hear the news from a third party. Explain why are applying and ask your boss for his or her support.

Prepare For the Promotion. Prepare to pass your current job on to someone else; have all of your ducks in a row. If your goal is to continue moving up in the company, leaving a mess behind can reflect poorly on you. Offer to assist with training and to be available for questions.

During the Job Promotion Interview

Stay Professional. Even though you know the company and you may even know the interviewer, do not lose your professional attitude.

It’s important not to come across as too casual and relaxed. It’s important to show the interviewer that you want the job, and have what it takes to succeed in the new role.

Highlight your strengths. Your strengths may include your familiarity with the position and the company, the success you have had in your current position, and the commitment you feel towards the company to make it as successful as possible.

Remember You Don’t Know Everything. Be prepared to talk about unfamiliar aspects of the position. Do not assume you already know the in’s and out’s. You may get caught off guard.

Don’t Be Over Confident. Do not go to the interview presuming that you “got the job” – an over confident attitude can be damaging.

Ask Questions. If you have questions about the new position, what your role will be, and how you would transition, be sure to ask during the interview. Here are examples of questions to ask the interviewer.

After the Job Promotion Interview

Say Thank You. Write a thank you note to the person that interviewed you. Reiterate your interest in the new position.

Don’t Burn Your Bridges. If you get the promotion, do not burn any bridges. You will be leaving co-workers behind, possibly becoming their superior, treat them with the same respect you did when you were working together. When the promotion is finalized, let your co-workers know that you are moving on. However, if the company is going to send an official announcement, wait until that is sent before sending a personal email message.

Don’t Have Hard Feelings. If you don’t get the job, leave any negative feelings behind and work towards the next promotion opportunity.

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Moving on Up: How to Ask for a Promotion

Promotion

This is another fantastic article we are sharing about what you need to do to prepare to take that next step and get the job promotion you are after.

Original article click here.

Asking for a promotion ranks high on the list of life’s most anxiety-inducing activities. Putting yourself out there to higher-ups can be intimidating, and competition can be fierce, especially in the current economic climate. And, of course, what if they say no ?

But—it’s also one of the most important things you can do for your career. If you want to move forward in your company or field, promotions are part of the game, and they won’t just be handed to you—you have to work (and ask!) for them.

Ready to take that next step? Here’s what to know before the big conversation.

1. Do Your Homework

The most important part of asking for a promotion is preparing ahead of time. When you make the ask, you’ll need to prove (with specifics) that you’re ready for the next step.

First, you’ll want to emphasize to your manager what you’ve brought to the table so far—it’s a good measure of both your contributions and your future potential. Make a list of all of your accomplishments to use as your talking points. Have you taken on a side project that grew into a new revenue stream? Doubled your sales goals in less than six months? Doing a great job in your position isn’t enough to make your case—you’ll need to show that you’ve gone above and beyond .

Next, identify the specific position you want, and why you’re ready to take it on. If you’re asking to become assistant manager, know what that entails and then demonstrate that you’ll be able to fulfill the position. Want to be a team leader ? Give examples of how you’ve successfully managed smaller projects or groups of people, like coordinating your department’s internship program. Find concrete examples that prove that you’re the right person for the job.

2. Plan the Timing

There’s no “perfect” time to ask for a promotion, but some times are definitely better than others. The most straightforward time to ask is your annual (or semi-annual)review —it’s a built-in opportunity for both you and your manager to discuss how you’ve been doing and where your career is headed. (Just be sure that you’re not asking for a promotion solely because you’re up for review—you still need to demonstrate that you deserve the bump.)

Also consider your position in the company and what’s going on within your department or team. Are people around you leaving or moving up the ranks? Is your department merging with another, or repositioning itself within the company? When there’s a lot of overall change going on, it presents a great opportunity to step up and ask your boss where she sees you fitting in as the organization moves forward.

Finally, don’t be scared off by the dismal economy . Even in these tough times, smart employers understand that their employees are one of their most valuable assets, and they’ll want to retain (and reward) the best of them. You might get a smaller salary bump than people did in years past, but a promotion isn’t just about the money: It’s also about increased responsibilities, and hopefully you’ll be fiscally rewarded when the economy starts to turn around, even if you aren’t now.

3. Ask for the Meeting

If you decide to ask for a promotion when it’s not annual review time, plan ahead before you approach your manager. Send an email requesting a meeting, and make it clear that you’d like to discuss your performance and potential. You don’t want to show up to a meeting and catch your manager off guard—by giving her advance notice, she’ll have time to reflect on your performance and what the company will be able to offer you, position- and raise-wise.

4. Know Your Numbers

One of the biggest career mistakes women make is not negotiating their salary . According to a 2008 Carnegie Mellon study , men are four times more likely to negotiate a first salary than women, and 2.5 times more women than men said they feel “a great deal of apprehension” about negotiation. That’s not a good thing!

You shouldn’t discuss numbers until you’ve actually been offered a promotion, but you should be prepared to have the conversation if it arises. So, do your research and know what you’re worth, both within the company and outside of it. Check out PayScale andSalary.com , and see if you can find out the norms for your industry and company, too.

Then, when negotiation talks begin, don’t sell yourself short—it doesn’t hurt to ask for too much. That’s the nature of the negotiating game: they can always offer you less than what you ask for, but they’ll never offer you more.

5. Follow Up

If you get the promotion, great! Go out and celebrate—you deserve it! But if not, know that it’s not the end of the world, and more importantly, don’t just close the conversation just yet.

Make sure you leave the meeting with an idea of what will happen down the road. If now is not a good time for the department to be offering promotions, ask your boss when you can revisit the conversation. If he or she said no based on your current qualifications, get feedback on steps you can take to gain experience and be considered for a promotion in the future.

Above all, know that if you’re in the right position, your manager will be glad that you’re looking to advance. Nobody ever gets fired for asking for a promotion (trust me!). But if you don’t ask, you’re only hurting yourself.

 

Power Writers USA wants to hear any questions or comments about this article we are sharing.

Moving Up the Ladder: 10 Strategies for Getting Yourself Promoted

Job Promotion

This week we will be sharing articles that focus on how you can increase your worth and develop your career by preparing and asking  for a promotion or a raise.  On top of offering specific advice for how to get yourself promoted this article is a great read for anyone looking to give a boost to their career.

Original article click here.

10 Strategies for Getting Yourself Promoted

Some career experts say that the day you start a new job you should begin planning for your next job. And you know what? You should! Just make sure that you stay focused enough on the job you were hired for that you succeed and excel in that position before looking for the next one.

Promotions are not a given. It used to be that workers progressed along specific career paths during their careers, but the impact of technology, globalization, and flatter organizational structures, has changed that paradigm. Today, employees have to create and manage their own career paths — through one or multiple organizations. And remember that a promotion is not always an upward path. Sometimes — especially in today’s business environment — you may need to make a lateral move to position yourself for a later upward move.

How do you develop your promotion plan? Incorporate these 10 strategies into your plan.

1. Develop Mentoring Relationships
One recent study found that in four out of five promotions, those promoted had a mentoring relationship with someone higher in the company who helped spread the good word about them. Some companies have formal mentoring programs, but even if your company does not, there are still ways you can build relationships with people in higher positions in the company. Mentors can also be great sources for information and career guidance.

2. Quantify Results
While promotions are not necessarily based on your past performance, you can certainly make a much better case for a promotion by showing detailed information about your past successes. Those who get results get ahead.

Keep a record of everything you do that enhances the company’s bottom line, that puts the company or your department in a good light, that is creative and innovative, and that shows your loyalty and commitment to the organization.

3. Practice Self-Promotion
We’re taught by our families that modesty is a virtue, but just as with job-hunting, if no one knows how great you are, you simply won’t get ahead. Be a known quantity. If you have had major accomplishments or created new or award-winning programs, make sure people know about them — especially the people doing the promoting.

Sell yourself — and let it be known that you are seeking a promotion. One professional we know sends out a monthly email to his boss and his boss’s boss to keep them updated on his progress on various projects — and to share any accomplishments and accolades that occurred in the previous month.

4. Establish a Bond with Your Boss
It might help to think of your boss as one of those border guards between countries. S/he can either be raising the gate and waving you onward and upward to your next position within the company, or s/he can be keeping the gate down and blocking you from any movement within the company. Use all opportunities to make your boss a key supporter of your promotion.

Use professional settings to seek counsel and stress your interest in staying with the company. Use performance appraisals not just to go over your accomplishments, but to talk with your boss about potential roadblocks to a promotion — and how to overcome those roadblocks.

Some experts also suggest building rapport with your boss by learning more about his or her outside interests and hobbies — and then chatting about them during conferences, parties, or other informal activities.

5. Acquire New Knowledge and Skills
It goes without saying that one of the best ways to succeed in getting a promotion is to expand your knowledge and skills sets in areas that are critical to the organization. As technology and other environmental forces change rapidly, you need an ever-increasing skill set not only to perform your job, but to stay marketable.

Experts also suggest that employees who want to get ahead should not only keep current with industry news and events, but to also pay attention to trends and events outside their specialty.

6. Build Your Network
The more people who know you, know your strengths and abilities, know your value to the organization, and know (at least some of) your ambitions, the more likely your name will be discussed when opportunities arise.

An added benefit of networking is that you will learn much more about the company if you network with people in other areas of the organization. Learn more about networking here.

7. Ask for More Responsibilities
Volunteering to help out other departments or teams — or simply asking for more responsibilities — increases your value within the organization. Asking for more work shows your interest and desire to help your department and company to succeed — as well as putting a spotlight on your value to the organization.

8. Act Professionally at All Times
Earn a reputation for being dependable, professional, and cooperative. Act and look the part.

  • Dress professionally and neatly — even on business casual days.
  • Ask questions when you aren’t sure how to do something.
  • Dare to be different — make yourself stand out from the pack.
  • Keep a positive outlook on things, even when in tough situations.
  • Don’t whine or complain – or blame others — when things don’t go your way.
  • Make a name for yourself in your industry through conferences, articles, speeches.
  • Don’t be a clock-watcher.

Finally, be a problem-solver. Don’t go to your boss with problems. If a difficult situation arises, be sure to come up with at least one solution before seeking your boss’s blessing for dealing with the situation. Problem-solvers get promoted. Complainers who expect the boss to solve all their problems don’t.

9. Be a Team Player
Because so much of work is now accomplished through teams — departmental or cross-functional — it becomes even more important to share successes with your team and to avoid pointing your finger when there are failures.

And by being a team player, you only build your reputation and increase your value to the organization.

10. Create Your Own Opportunities
After studying the needs and challenges of the organizations, if you see an area that has been neglected — and you have key skills in that area – write a proposal for a new position.

And even if the company does not go for the new position, you have again shown your initiative, creativity, and value to the firm — and these things can only help you the next time you request a promotion.

    Surefire Ways Not to Get Promoted
  1. Don’t plan your day. Go to work each day without a plan in mind.
  2. Do the minimum. Have the attitude of “they don’t pay me for that.”
  3. Rely on your current base of knowledge. No need to learn new skills.
  4. Voice your complaints. Be vocal about what you don’t like at work.
  5. Don’t share the credit. Put your name alone at the top of successful projects.

From Dr. Donald E. Wetmore’s The Productivity Institute

Questions about some of the terminology used in this article? Get more information (definitions and links) on key college, career, and job-search terms by going to our Job-Seeker’s Glossary of Job-Hunting Terms.

Article By: Randall S. Hansen, Ph.D.

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