Resume Tips for Remote Workers

Remote Worker Resume Tips

Seeking remote work employment? Showcase your track record of successful remote work achievements.  But how do you really make those successes shine?  Below we outline a few resume tips for remote workers that may aid the process.

With the increase in remote work opportunities, employers have learned that total freedom of space is a required skill to manage successfully. At the same time, it’s a quick realization that not everyone is qualified for the responsibility.

In order for your resume to stand out from the crowd, weave the remote roles into your current resume gracefully.

Three ways to highlight your remote work experience and talents:

1. Out with It.

Making a great success out of remote work opportunities is an achievement that your resume should reflect that message clearly.

Historically, the ‘Previous Employment’ section of a resume would have the employer’s location. Alongside the title role. This is an area that can slightly shift in design to highlight the location of remote work.  Here are a few suggestions:

List the organization’s corporate location using a city/state format. Then, in the first sentence, note that the work is performed remotely.

Secondly, skip city/state altogether in the formatting and note that the work was performed remotely in the first sentence.

Another option is to list “Remote Work” in place of city/state.

For those with extensive remote experience consider separating home-office jobs into their own “Remote Work Experience” section. This has the advantage of increasing confidence in hiring managers. When they see a list of previous employers who have trusted you to telecommute, that speaks volumes for your abilities to perform well.

Just be sure you don’t distract from your best qualifications by inadvertently hiding some relevant non-remote experience in a lower section.

2. Talk up the Details.

Outline your previous job tasks and accomplishments. Deliberately detail how they were successfully performed remotely. The goal of really strong resumes is to tell your story. The proof is in the details!

For instance, an effective presentation of a customer service position might read something like, “Attended to 50+ customer inquiries each day through the company’s website from a dedicated coworking space with a high-speed Internet connection.”

Or for a sales role, perhaps include a statement such as, “Recognized by management as the top performer for the 2019 fiscal year for converting more cold calls into billable accounts than any other remote worker.”

3. Focus on Skills.

When work is being performed remotely, the skills section of your resume must make an impact.  While every good employee is strong as a self-starter, great communicators, and champions of time management, remote workers need to show this in spotlight style focus.

When discussing your skills, look at how they particularly fit into the remote work ecosystem. Good communicators, for instance, may want to mention their comfort using video conferencing, chat platforms, and instant messaging to stay in touch with others on the remote team.

Strong collaborators could talk about using shared documents strategies and scheduled daily check-ins to accomplish company goals and stay on target while off-site.

Always remember that your resume is to get a foot in the door.  It is meant to tell your story in a punchy and concise format that presents yourself as a solid candidate for continued remote work successes.  

Chances are if a company is hiring for a remote role, then they are perfectly aware of what challenges and successes are possible. Let them know you are a valuable addition to working from any location!

Need to get ready for job search success?  Our team at PWU is here to help.

We offer Resume updates, Cover Letters, LinkedIn Optimization, Recruiter Services, and Professional Career Coaching.

Book a free 15-min consult here https://calendly.com/powerwritersusa-ca

Standing out in a Competitive Industry

Standing out in a Competitive Industry

When you’re applying for a job, standing out from the crowd is always a challenge. But, this tough task can suddenly seem insurmountable when you’re applying for an extremely competitive position. Have a read below for 5 actions that are helpful to you standing out in a competitive industry.

However, spending all of your time obsessing over the intense competition will only serve to make you feel more anxious and self-conscious—qualities that definitely won’t help you approach your job hunt and interviews with confidence. So, let go of that intimidation and instead focus on doing what you need to do to separate yourself from the pack.

But, how can you draw positive attention to yourself, when there are hundreds of other people applying to that exact same job? Here are five tips that are sure to help you stand out from that pile of other applicants.

1. Get Personal

Feeling like you’re submitting your materials into cyberspace is always frustrating—especially when you put so much time and effort into them. And, when you know that tons of other people are following that exact same process, it’s easy to feel like you’re in a long line just waiting to draw your number.

This is when making a personal connection can make a huge difference. What exactly does this mean? Start by seeing if you know anyone who currently works for that employer. Whether it’s an old friend or an acquaintance on LinkedIn, having someone who can hand-deliver your resume or put in a good word for you can really help to put your name at the top of the interview list.

If you can’t track down someone who can refer or recommend you, you should still make an effort to be as personal as possible in your application materials. Skip that generic “To Whom It May Concern” line (those letters typically find their way directly to the wastebasket!), and instead do some digging to see if you can find the name of the person you’d be working directly for—or even the hiring manager.

Knowing that you put in the legwork and research necessary to personally address your documents immediately portrays you as a dedicated and resourceful applicant. And, that reputation is sure to put you back at the top of the pile!

2. Improve Your Documents

A resume that’s riddled with typos and grammatical errors. A cover letter that contains the wrong company name. Yes, they’re all sure to make the hiring manager remember you—but not necessarily in a positive light.

It seems basic, but going through your resume and cover letter with a fine-tooth comb is absolutely necessary. Not only is this a best practice when applying for any sort of job, it’s also a surefire way to help you differentiate yourself from the crowd—you wouldn’t believe how much of your competition is immediately discounted, simply because their documents are sloppy.

Aside from just scanning for basic errors, now’s also a great time to polish your materials and make sure that they’re memorable and impactful. Ensure that you include quantifiable achievements in your resume that don’t only tell how great you are at what you do, but show it as well. Start your cover letter off with an engaging and captivating story, rather than that standard, “I’m writing in regards to…” line.

No, you don’t want to send a singing telegram or print your resume on hot pink paper. However, these more subtle tweaks and additions can really help you to be remembered—in a way that’s not eccentric and over-the-top.

3. Go Above and Beyond

I won’t deny that your resume and cover letter are extremely important documents for job search success. But, does that mean they’re absolutely the only things you need in order to land your dream job? Absolutely not.

You should never hesitate to go the extra mile, show some initiative, and share some other materials that a potential employer might care about. Go ahead and send them a link to your portfolio or personal blog. Anything that helps them to get a better sense of who you are as a candidate will benefit you!

You can even take things one step further by completing a sample specifically for that employer. Applying for a social media management position? Pull together a brief example of a social media strategy that you think could work for them. Want to be a data analyst? Share that amazing Excel spreadsheet you built—complicated macros and all. Showing that extra effort demonstrates how interested you are in the position. And, if they actually like the sample work you create? Well, then you’ve already got one foot in the door!

4. Polish Your Social Media Presence

Your work examples and official career documents will only take you so far. After all, employers pretty much expect that you’ll put your best foot forward when it comes to those materials. So, what will they do next? More than likely, hiring managers will look you up on social media.

Believe me, you don’t want to be remembered as the candidate who stars in that video for “Phi Sigma Rho’s Longest Keg Stand” or the applicant who writes scathing reviews of every single ex-boss on Facebook.

So, before even submitting your stuff, ensure you’ve taken the time to clean up your social media profiles. Bonus points for actually taking the time to polish and update your LinkedIn profile while you’re at it!

5. Follow Up

You know all of that intense competition we talked about? Well, it not only overwhelms you—it’s also pretty overwhelming to the hiring manager as well. Suddenly, they have an inbox full of submissions, and it’s up to them to weed out the junk in order to find those diamonds in the rough.

So, don’t be surprised if you don’t hear back immediately about that job you’re so excited about. In fact, you likely won’t receive a super timely response. This is why following up is so important.

If you haven’t heard anything (whether that’s a “yes”, “thanks, but no thanks”, or a “we’ve received your submission” email) in about a week or two, feel free to reach out personally and check in on a timeline for a hiring decision. Make an attempt to use the most personalized email address you can find. But, if you can’t hunt one of those down, a general “info” or “careers” address will suffice as well.

Craft a friendly message just asking for an update on the hiring process for that specific position, reiterate your excitement about the opportunity, and thank them for their time. Still radio silence? You’re free to follow up once more. But, after that, it’s time to let it go. We all know there’s a fine line between being persistent and being a pest.

Standing out from the crowd when the job competition is stiff can undoubtedly be tough. But, it’s not impossible! It just involves some thought and creativity. Put these tips to use, and you’re sure to find your way to the top of that resume pile.

Need to get ready for job search success?  Our team at PWU is here to help.

We offer Resume updates, Cover Letters, LinkedIn Optimization, Recruiter Services, and Professional Career Coaching.

Book a free 15-min consult here https://calendly.com/powerwritersusa-ca

3 Tips for Starting a New Job

3 Tips for Starting a New Job

The job search time has been invested.  The efforts are now paid-in-full. Your first day on the job is scheduled. Sweet victory! Now it’s time to focus on exceeding expectations after you join the company. Here are 3 Tips for starting a new job.

1. Make relationships your number one priority.

The first month in a job is an important time to meet new colleagues, both inside and outside of your team. It’s important to continue cultivating those relationships in the months that follow. 

Do this in ways that feel natural to you. If you’re a fan of formal feedback, schedule in periodic feedback chats with your manager and colleagues. If you’d prefer a more casual approach, put in the effort to organize coffee or drinks with coworkers.

Importantly, be sure these efforts are not just focused on your manager or people above you. While it is important to be on the radar of higher-ups, it’s equally critical that others get fair attention. This includes those you work with and who work under you.

Spending all your effort on people above you can be perceived as sucking up—which means you’ll not only not build relationships with other colleagues, but potentially that they’ll distrust your motives. 

2. Write down your goals, and get feedback on them

Your manager might have a very defined set of goals for you, particularly if you’re in a role like sales which typically has very measurable and predetermined targets. If this isn’t the case, however, it’s important to give yourself some goals to work towards. 

Think about it like this: If you haven’t set yourself a target, how will you be able to measure whether you’ve done a good job after six months?

Putting tangible deliverables on paper—even if they change—is a good way to both stay on track as well as to create evidence for your manager and colleagues that you can deliver. This is no doubt helpful for formal reviews but can be equally as useful as a reflection tool to make sure you’re prioritizing the right things. 

You might write your goals in collaboration with your manager and/or colleagues. If you come up with them on your own, however, be sure to seek feedback from (at least) your manager, as you’re still new to the role and want to be sure you’re focusing on the right things. 

Lastly, remember that goals aren’t useful if you simply write them down and forget about them. Schedule yourself reminders to review your progress, either alone or with others, which can give you a chance to re-adjust if things aren’t going as planned. 

3. Keep an open mind and ask questions

While starting a new job can be daunting. There’s a lot to learn, being new to the company also gives you a fresh perspective—and one that can be invaluable to the rest of the team. Since you’re coming in without preconceptions or biases, you may well identify areas for improvement that others have overlooked. 

It’s therefore important that you ask questions when you don’t understand why things are a certain way. Rather than accepting them at face value. Just because a process, standing meeting or team structure exists in a certain way, that doesn’t mean that it’s a big picture ideal.

As a new hire, you’re in a unique place to be able to identify inefficiencies and broken processes. 

That said, approach areas for improvement with curiosity. There’s no room for judgment since there may well be a reason that something is done a certain way. It’s better to appear curious and learn something new than to assume you know the right answer. And potentially be proven wrong.

We hope these 3 Tips for starting a new job help. This can be a very playful time to relax, be yourself and get to know your new work environment.

If you wanted to take it a step further, check our previous entry on Setting Career Goals. We’ve put together 7 helpful tips here: https://powerwritersusa.com/7-success-tips-to-setting-career-goals/

Employee Engagement Drives Performance

Employee engagement drives company performance

Last week, we talked about mental health in the workplace. Now we can draw a line directly between positive mental health and employee engagement.  This is simply due to the basis of a person who is engaged, generally has a greater sense of purpose in their daily practices. And, purpose along with employee engagement, drives performance.

Which, ultimately leads to better decision-making. 

Companies that rank high in the employee engagement area are Google, Virgin, Cisco, Salesforce, Hilton, Dreamworks Animation, American Express, and the list goes on. 

Employee Engagement By Definition

“Employee engagement is the extent to which employees feel passionate about their jobs, are committed to the organization, and put discretionary effort into their work.”

That being said, employee engagement is not the same as employee satisfaction.

So what’s the difference?

Employee Satisfaction only indicates how happy or content your employees are on a daily basis. For some employees, being satisfied means working close to home and with nice people. Others are just collecting a paycheck and doing as little work as possible.

Examples of employee satisfaction are

  • Work hours
  • Office location
  • Commute length
  • Flexibility
  • Company culture
  • Office politics
  • Leadership tone
  • Consistency 
  • Workload
  • Social status
  • Health & Safety
  • Trust

The list is extensive and we could go father than those listed above.

As a result, job satisfaction is how employees think and feel about their jobs.  

A satisfied employee may view their job as enjoyable, fulfilling and meaningful.  Whereas, a dissatisfied employee can view their job as pointless, demeaning and stressful.

So, why is employee engagement important?

Employee engagement drives performance which goes beyond the day to day normals. Going further, employee engagement drives performance. Engaged employees look at the whole of the company and understand their purpose, where, and how they fit in. 

In addition to this, employee engagement addresses their level of motivation, involvement, and emotional commitment to the job, the company, and their co-workers.

So how is this achieved?  Here are a few examples:

1. Assign company values

Assign one of your company’s values to a certain employee, every month, based on a peer voting process. The person who best represented that value can be set as an example and properly acknowledged for their actions.

2. Encourage personal projects.

Dreamwork Animation does through a short story initiative.  Designers pitch short stories where the winners are awarded the time and team resources to bring the animation to life!  

Depending on your company, personal projects can bring different departments together and connect employees outside of the on-going routine.  All of which benefits the overall engagement of everyone involved.

3. Assign a buddy/mentor for every newcomer.

If your organization is on the large side, this engagement tip can make a HUGE impact. Onboarding, as we know, is critical to your new employee’s ability to adapt and gain an early sense of achievement. As a result, a trustworthy relationship is built with someone more experienced in the company that can guide the newcomer. 

4. Encourage charity.

Perhaps there’s a cause that aligns with your company’s mission. You can empower employees to team up and raise money for that cause, in a friendly but competitive manner. 

5. Encourage volunteering

Volunteer-for-a-cause is a great way to allow the team to gain a deeper connection to their jobs.. Give your employees dedicated time to volunteer for a cause they support. 

6. Celebrate achievements

Big or small, they are the solid proof that the work people are putting in has meaning. No one can go through tasks and assignments for months or even years without burning out. Refill the team’s energy tanks with some recognition and celebrate hard work. This is also a great way to foster a stronger team function.

7. Have themed office days.

For the more open-minded companies, this initiative can bring a lot of fun.. Have a Hat Day. Maybe a March 14th, Pi Day where people can bring in pie-like treats. Seasonal Theme Days can help break up the looping annual routines. 

The range is diverse and can really boost up employee morale.  Not to mention, pleasantly fracture monotony in the work routine.

8. Celebrate your people!

Birthdays, promotions, retirements, newcomers welcoming, there are plenty of important moments where people can be put at the front of the company. They literally make the company and it’s a great and relaxing way of showing them that they matter.

Cultivate Top Performers.

The goal of Customer Engagement practices is to develop as many top performers as possible.

Top performers embrace change. They search out ways to improve themselves and challenge the status quo. These achievers hold themselves accountable for delivering results. 

Whereas, low performers avoid accountability, cling to the status quo, and resist change.

Outperform the Competition.

There’s plenty of stats out there on organizations with an engaged workforce outperforming their competition. Companies have reported higher earning per share (EPS) and faster recovery after recessions and financial setbacks. Engagement is a key differentiator when it comes to growth and innovation. 

As a result, a company that has an effective employee engagement strategy and a highly engaged workforce is more likely to retain top performers as well as attract new talent.

Moreover, the expectations of employees have changed.  Mobile professional careers are much more common than “job for lifers”. Also, the retention of top talent is more difficult than before.

The bottom-line, successful organizations are value-driven with employee-centric cultures.

How does your organization measure up?

Tune in next week when we goo deeper into how employee engagement is measured in the workforce. We’ll discuss how to measure employee engagement.  Along with what is needed to prepare a readiness assessment and embark on a value-added engagement survey.

8 Tips to Beat Applicant Tracking Systems

8 tips to beat applicant tracking systems

From the first known resume in 1482 by Leonardo DaVinci through the 1500s in England into the 20th Century and current Digital Age. Resume formats have changed dramatically over the years. Modern-day resumes must now contain a very specific format in order to beat Applicant Tracking Systems.

If you’re on the search for a new job and not getting the desired traction, your resume may not be ideal for ATS. In which case, have a read below for 8 tips to beat Applicant Tracking Systems.

#1 – Use ATS Resume Keywords Correctly.

The design of Applicant Tracking Software is to scan for keywords that relate to the job and industry. The proper usage of keywords is what sets your resume apart from others by gaining ATS high ranking. Like a high score in PacMan, ATS high ranking means your resume levels up.

Look at the job description of your ideal position. If you’re applying for a job within a specific industry, this is where you can identify the major keywords that relate to that industry or the position you seek. 

Include these keywords in a core competencies or skills section.

But be careful, one thing that’s just as bad as not having the correct keywords is over-using them. The ATS will reject an overstuffed resume as quickly as it would a resume with insufficient keywords.

#2 – Format Your Resume Correctly.

Stick to a traditional resume format at all times.

Text boxes, footers, headers, and graphics read as clutter during the scan which can result in your resume being rejected. Choose a basic format like reverse-chronological, functional or hybrid, to ensure the resume can be scanned by ATS and easy for a recruiter to read.

#3 – Send The Correct File Type

 Applicant tracking systems need to be able to scan and read your resume. The safest way to ensure that your resume will be read is to submit it in a Microsoft Word Doc file. 

Even though many of the systems are now advanced enough to read a PDF, you should still send a Doc file to be on the safe side. A Doc file is the preferred file type for both ATS and many recruiters.

You should also always check the job description to see if the employer wants a certain file type. Often times, employers will specify a certain file type, so it’s recommended to have both versions available.

#4 – Label Sections

If your layout is not done properly, the ATS may have trouble identifying where you worked, what you did, and how long you were there. We want to ensure the ATS can read the entire resume correctly. To do this, label your resume sections properly. Use subheadings such as work experience, education, and interests, etc.

Also, verify that the location, position, and length of employment information you provide is clear and consistent throughout your resume.

use a professional font

#5 – Use A Professional Font.

We can’t stress this enough, stick to a professional font. When your resume passes through ATS, the next step is recruiter review. And professional recruiters generally do not favor comic sans.

The best fonts to use for your resume are:

  • Arial
  • Calibri
  • Georgia
  • Helvetica

#6 – Make Spelling And Grammar Top-Level Priority.

Spelling errors can, and will, cause a resume to be automatically rejected. Additionally, the majority of recruiters will also dismiss a resume even if it contains only a single error.

Consider this, according to CareerBuilder, 58% of resumes contain spelling and grammatical errors. Read that again, over half of the resumes out there are a hot-mess in the actual wording department.  Join 40% of applicants that get spelling and grammar correct.

Pro-Tip: Grammerly is a wonderful tool!

#7 – Resume File Name

Yes, what you name the file matters. Even though it might get through ATS, recruiters will often ignore unprofessional resume names. Use your first and last name, or a combination of the two.

You should also add either the word “resume” or the position you seek.

Examples:

JohnS.Resume.doc

JohnSmith.Resume.doc

John.SalesManager.doc

This is also important because if a recruiter needs to go back and find you in the system, they can easily do so by searching your name in the database. This also holds true if someone is referring you. Your resume needs to be easily found should the recruiter want to pull up your file. 

#8 – Make Sure You Are Qualified For The Job.

To sum it all up, make sure you meet the qualifications of the job posting. Blindly sending out tons of resumes is a waste of your time.

It’s better to take your time and go through each job description to verify that you’re qualified. The ATS are designed to see if the candidate is a good match for the job and verify that he or she has the qualifications needed.

However, don’t be discouraged from applying for jobs where you meet most of the qualifications. If a position asks for 2 years of experience and you only have one, go for it anyway!

Patience and persistence are the names of the game now. It may take longer than you anticipated, or you could find the ideal fit quite quickly. Stay with it to step up to your next opportunity!

If all this overwhelms you…

Remember, you can always hire a professional. Whether you’re needing a Resume update, Cover Letter, Recruitment Services or LinkedIn Profile Optimization, our team at PWU has what you need.

Follow the link for a free resume review and consultation. https://calendly.com/powerwritersusa-ca

7 Reasons LinkedIn Is Your #1 Job Search Site

linkedin job search

When used properly, LinkedIn can be a job-seekers best friend. With an optimized profile, you can send a broader message of your skills and achievement to gain an endless amount of connections. Making LinkedIn Your #1 Job Search Site.

However, LinkedIn profiles are not to be used as a copy and paste of your resume. Remember, this is a networking tool.  The aim is to showcase more than your resume can while still using mandatory keywords and SEO optimization

1. Make Your Headline Count

Your LinkedIn headline is your online brand. Along with the profile picture, the name and headline are what impact those who view the profile.  Keep that headline tidy and on-point to stand out from the crowd.  Consider how these 2 headlines sound:

“Marketer seeking next opportunity”

or

“Consumer Products Marketer Looking for Small Brand to Make Big”

No brainer, right? Make your headline count! 

2. Follow Your Target Companies

First off, if you haven’t already, create a list of ideal companies that align with your interests and skills.  Use this list as your go-to for snooping around LinkedIn with intent. 

Now, go follow those specific companies.

This way, you’ll hear about anything new they’ve got happening. from a new branch office opening to a new product release or possibly even a hiring push.

3. Broaden Your Network

If you haven’t been meticulous about inviting new networking contacts and old colleagues to join your LinkedIn network, get caught up now! You can download your address books from any webmail application or Outlook contacts.

Consider this, one new first-degree contact with 100 connections of their own can expand your first-second-and-third-degree network by tens of thousands of people.

That’s good at any point, but especially in a job search where you’re looking for as much visibility into your professional ecosystem as you can get.

4. Get That Intro!

If your first-degree connection knows someone you’d like to talk to, ask for an introduction.

Just browse to your target person’s LinkedIn profile, look for the blue link that says “Send a Message” and click on the arrow on the right of the link.  If you and your target person have a common connection, you’ll see a “Get an Introduction” pull-down menu. Easy Peasy Lemon Squeazy.

5. Find Your Hiring Manager

You can use the Advanced People Search to find hiring managers in most companies.  Click ‘Advanced’ next to the search bar at the top of the page. Then enter your target company name with the most likely title for your hiring manager as a second search term.

For instance, if you’re a Marketing person, your hiring manager could be Marketing Director or Marketing VP.  Use your instinct and search around a bit.  You’ll likely find the connection you need in no time!

 6. Your Network Is A Fountain of Wisdom

Go back to the Advanced Search page and conduct a search using just your target company’s name as a search term. Who in your network is connected to that company, and how? Those folks can do more than just make introductions. They can offer insight into the company and also who they may know directly.

Remember that a job search is not just about being noticed and making connections. It’s also about learning enough to decide whether a company can use your talents plus grow your skills.  A little research can show whether it’s worth your time to pursue opportunities with your target company.

7. Stay In It!

Patience and persistence are the names of the game now. It may take longer than you anticipated, or you could find the ideal fit quite quickly. Stay with it to step up to your next opportunity!

We want to see all or clients operating at top value when it comes to using LinkedIn for job search purposes. Whether you’re needing a Resume update, Cover Letter, Recruitment Services or LinkedIn Profile Optimization, our team at PWU has what you need.

Follow the link for a free resume review and consultation. https://calendly.com/powerwritersusa-ca

Do I Need Multiple Versions Of My Resume?

It’s a common question.  Do I need multiple versions of my resume? 

This is an important issue to discuss because a lot of professionals tend to develop a background in at least three, or even more, thematic work areas as time and their careers progress. In this article, we show both sides of the equation and the reasoning behind them. 

Spoiler alert:  The short answer is no but let’s discuss all angles.

In modern business practices, job seekers develop a wide range of skills and experiences. It is competitive out there and staying ahead of the game requires diversification. For example, some job applicants have worked in human resources, communications, and event planning. 

“The quote I got from XYZ Resume Writers which says I need 3 different resumes and to focus on one specialization to keep the resume simple. Do I really need multiple versions of my resume?”

This perspective and business model is, more times than not, a reflection of the individual writer’s underdeveloped skill set.  It takes finesse to really shape the context of a work history into a professional format with high success rates.

So, can HR, Communications, and Event Planning all be covered in a single resume? 

We believe in a resounding YES. A professional resume writer with extensive years of experience can formulate diverse history into a keyword-rich resume that exceeds expectations.

It’s not what you’ve done in the past, but rather the direction you plan to go next.

There are always transferable skills that help ease the transition and bridge roles.

A written format that highlights all the skills acquired in these roles and draws a bigger picture directed towards the roles you are aiming for. 

Without the resume reading as cluttered and indigestible to the reader’s eye.

professional resume writer uses keywords for success

It’s about streamlining without losing focus on keywords. It’s about representing your assets with varying themes and keeping it tidy.

Plus, it is time-consuming to keep modifying a major chunk of your resume just to highlight focus. Why pay a writer to create a product which you then have to babysit and micro manage?

All this is assuming you are maintaining your current career path. 

Now, if you’re jumping entire industries or career fields then, yes, perhaps it may be necessary to have more than one resume in your toolkit.

For example, you started out as a roofer and then became a builder and later moved into sales of roofing products. As part of your role, you were very involved in a new software implementation and you’ve decided to go into IT. That sort of transition requires a finely-tuned eye to keep the right content, and minimize or eliminate the (less) valuable content…. relating directly to how the resume performs for you.

Additionally, If there’s too much going on it can be difficult for recruiters to judge whether you are actually good at the role they want you to perform. Again, a really strong resume writer will help direct the keywords and content to be heavy in the direction you want to go.

That being said, if you are looking to change career paths, Power Writers USA is here to help reshape your resume for success across your entire search. Feel free to connect with us for a free consultation and resume review.

Remember, the name of the game is algorithms and ATS filters, which is everybody’s challenge right now.  The past few years, formatting styles have changed and with that in mind, we’d love to take a look at what specifics points our team can do to improve the impact your resume makes across all your ideal job prospects.

Shifting Careers Between Freelance and Corporate

shifting careers corporate freelance

We’ve recently been looking at the double lane highway of shifting careers between freelance and corporate life.  From the perspective of professional resume writers, we’ve definitely seen equal movement between these 2 career directions.

Without question, transitioning from life at a corporate firm to working freelance is a HUGE life change. The greatest technique is in all the individual action steps taken to create a strong outcome. Successes certainly live in the daily grind.

Write a plan of action.

This helps maintain accountability and keep you on track.

If you’re not entirely familiar with the details of a business plan, that’s perfectly fine.  Think of your plan like a map. Begin with goal setting. Outline short-term and long-term goals and place them into a loose chronological order, the specific dates matter less than the actual structure.

Don’t burn any bridges.

Although it’s tempting to skip gleefully out of the door on your last day in the office telling everybody how great your new life is going to be, don’t.  You never know when you might need these contacts again, not to mention references from your employer. Leaving with a recommendation is never a bad outcome. 

Friendly reminder: The world is a very small place. and you never know where your future clients may be. 

Network.

This may sound dramatic but, ultimately you need to make sure EVERYONE knows you are going freelance: ex-colleagues, friends, old classmates, that neighbor with a beard.  Everyone.  Remember, getting work once you go freelance can take longer than imagined so build-up a client base in all ways possible.

Work is much more likely to come through known contacts. That’s just the nature of humans in general. We work with who we know and trust.

Network as much as possible, both in person and on social media.

Speak to friends or acquaintances who have made the leap to freelancing. These people are valuable resources for advice not just on those first few weeks starting out, but for the long haul.

Essentially freelancing is building your personal brand. 

This is a fact. Fortunately, there is ample information out there on the specifics of personal branding.  Quickprout has a nice guide that summarizes the process giving actionable items that help map the route. A quick Google tour will land you in front of some seriously good content for designing and managing your own personal brand.

Utilize social media.

Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn are all useful tools. Additionally, if your LinkedIn profile isn’t yet optimized, get it there.  Our team is highly skilled at LinkedIn optimizations that show clients in their best light possible.  This is mandatory in today’s workforce.

Optimize linkedin profile

94% of recruiters are searching for talent on LinkedIn. Use this tool.

Lastly, consider starting a blog. Yes, they are timely but well-designed search engine optimized (SEO) blogs are a great way to drive attention towards your website. This, in turn, builds an audience and potential client base.

Don’t be shy about putting your business out there.

Now, if you find yourself on the highway heading back to corporate structures then the strategy is dramatically different. At this point, your resume must highlight all the unique skills acquired as a freelancer plus reflect positively on the actual time away from the workforce.

As always Power Writers USA is here to help guide you through the steps. Resume Writing, Cover Letters, LinkedIn Profile Optimization and Recruiter Resume Distribution are all available from our team at PWU. Connect with us for a free consultation and resume review!

Unquestionably, unless you are a writing wizard, it’s in your best interest to hire a professional resume writer now.  Freelance skills are diverse and translating all the detailed specifics to corporate necessity is key to your resume making it through ATS and recruiter processes.

There’s a New Kid in the Office

new hires first day new job

As mentioned in our blog post from last week, the projected hiring numbers are currently on the rise all across the Bay area and throughout Q4. Naturally, this got our office talking about the inevitable situation yet to come. There’s a new kid in the office.

Here you are in that well-planned morning office routine. The computer is on, next up is the daily cup of chamomile. Knowing the office kitchen is empty at this hour, you come around the corner all sleepy and BAM. There’s the new kid standing front and center looking, admittedly, slightly lost. 

 Quickly the mind transitions through a few options

  1. Panic and run back to your desk – nope
  2. Welcome the kid, introduce yourself and offer a tour – nope
  3. Pretend you’re invisible, and with no sudden movement, get your favorite mug under that hot water tap and return to your desk immediately – yep!

To be fair, not all personalities would take this approach.  Some people may actually resort to option 1.  Others are naturally inclined to take on Option 2.

Me, not so much.  I’m that introverted-writer-type who can spend an entire day interacting with my client calls and then happily writing, writing, writing and more writing.

Nonetheless, new hires are imminent.

We’ve all been here at some point and, let’s face it, being the new kid in class is always a little nerve-wracking, whether you’re 13 or 45.

All humor aside, obviously new hires should feel confident to ask colleagues anything necessary to their increased comfort around the office. That being said, part of the stress that comes with starting a new job is avoidable if we prepare ahead of time.

new kid in the office

Now let change the perspective. 

The new kid in the office is looking around the kitchen, lost as all-time and just wants to get that next caffeine fix. There’s a 200-page report parked on his desk demanding attention.

We’ve assembled a few tips on how to ease the office jitters before the first day. The goal is to be so ready that your focus can only be on the job.

Do your homework.

Do research on the organization or institution you’ll be joining — its structure, mission, and overall philosophy. You may be asked to provide feedback or even to come up with some questions and insights of your own during your first week. You’ll want to know as much as you can in order to feel prepared if you’re put on the spot.

Ask questions.

Be confident. You earned the position based on your skills and personality so don’t hesitate to ask for help.

Everyone was the new kid in the office at some point and we all know what it’s like to feel a little lost on the first day.

Take notes.

Your first few days at any new job are a real learning curve, and you’ll be taking in a lot of new information, from the mundane to the really important. Take notes so that can be referenced when a question comes up a few weeks or months down the line.  

Listen and absorb.

You’re stepping into a new role and the first few days and weeks are focused primarily on learning in order to be successful and thrive within the company. Make an effort to actively listen to everyone you come in contact — let them do most of the talking. Understand how the company works and where you will fit in.

Don’t criticize.

If part of your role is to improve things or change the status quo at your new employer, you may want to wait a few days before you start pointing out all the areas that need improvement. Ingratiate yourself with your coworkers first before letting loose with all of the problems you see in the company, or else they may end up feeling bombarded and hostile to any of your new ideas (no matter how beneficial they are to the company).

As always Power Writers USA is here to help guide you through the steps.

Resume Writing, Cover Letters, LinkedIn Profile Optimization and Recruiter Resume Distribution are all available from our team at PWU. Connect with us for a free consultation and resume review!