6 Traits of Visionary Leadership

6 Traits of Visionary Leadership

All throughout history, there is no shortage of truly inspirational and visionary leaders.  Elon Musk, CEO of SpaceX and Telsa Motors, Ford Motor Company’s former president and CEO, Alan Mulally, Adobe CEO Shantanu Narayen and of course Steve Jobs.  All of these leaders possess these 6 Traits of Visionary Leadership that inspired their teams to greatness.   

So, what are the skills that stand out as foundational in their approach?

Good Communication Skills

A visionary leader has good communication skills. They know how to verbalize their dreams and goals and can easily explain this to their team. For the leader, communication isn’t just one-sided. In addition to sharing her vision for the future, a visionary leader is also an active listener.

As more people “catch the vision,” leaders listen to their ideas and thoughts, incorporating them into the larger goal. Additionally, visionaries involve others in reaching their milestones and help the team members meet their personal goals.

Charismatic Leadership

Visionary leaders also have a unique charisma. Without question, it’s that certain something that draws people to them. It lifts team spirit and elevates moral which is a gateway to increased productivity.

True, some individuals are born with this type of personal flair but almost anyone can learn how to cultivate the confidence and energy associated with infectious charisma.

Foundation Development

Visionary leaders also are chief organizers. While many leaders have administrators that manage the processes, the leader often sets up the organization by establishing key departments or functions. As the organizer-in-chief, the visionary directs, develops and conducts meetings until reliable help is found. During the initial organization, a leader will take the time to build a solid foundation through establishing boards, councils or a company hierarchy.

Strategic Business Planner

Visionary leaders are strategic planners. Like a chess player, these leaders plan ahead to make the best business moves. Strategic planning involves creating an action plan with a particular strategy in mind. The leader’s vision defines what the organization will look like in the future and how it will function. His strategies are designed to take him toward his ultimate vision.

Risk Taker

Visionary leaders, like Elon Musk, are notable risk-takers. These leaders are willing to gamble on something they believe in, but the gamble is often a measured one. Visionaries are creative people that take the initiative with the appropriate action. Visionaries take intelligent risks that capitalize on prime conditions.

Resilience

Leaders who were brought in to guide companies through tumultuous times have to have tenacity and determination. Furthermore, they could likely be dealing with situations where they have to fight against old ideas, company politics, and external pressures.

Build on Your Natural Abilities

As a leader, you may not embody all 6 Traits of Visionary Leadership mentioned above, and that’s OK. It’s important to know which traits come naturally to you and which may not.

To develop your own leadership style, find a variety of mentors. Mentors can provide experienced perspectives to help you determine the best way to respond to business challenges. These mentors could be peers, potential investors or leaders from entirely different industries.

While you don’t have to follow all the advice you receive, remain receptive to new ideas. Additionally, as you accumulate experience, examine your actions and ask for regular feedback to discover your strengths and weaknesses.

Don’t just rely on your mentors’ experience — search for case studies. Consume as many news stories, articles, documentaries, books, and blog posts as you can. Learn how others approach challenges.

Continued Education

Finally, network to gain additional perspectives. Take advantage of workshops, conferences and other opportunities focused on leadership development to learn new skills and network with others who can offer diverse points of view.

Many of the leaders you admire aren’t superhuman — they’ve honed their ability to utilize their best traits to drive positive change within their organizations. Your approach to a situation can mean the difference between positive mental health and burnout, profit and loss and success and failure. When you learn to harness your greatest strengths, you become a better leader and a catalyst for change.

Need to get ready for job search success?  Our team at PWU is here to help.

In addition to Resume updates, we offer Cover Letters, LinkedIn Optimization, Recruiter Services, and Professional Career Coaching. Book a free 15-min consult here https://calendly.com/powerwritersusa-ca

Resume Tips for Remote Workers

Remote Worker Resume Tips

Seeking remote work employment? Showcase your track record of successful remote work achievements.  But how do you really make those successes shine?  Below we outline a few resume tips for remote workers that may aid the process.

With the increase in remote work opportunities, employers have learned that total freedom of space is a required skill to manage successfully. At the same time, it’s a quick realization that not everyone is qualified for the responsibility.

In order for your resume to stand out from the crowd, weave the remote roles into your current resume gracefully.

Three ways to highlight your remote work experience and talents:

1. Out with It.

Making a great success out of remote work opportunities is an achievement that your resume should reflect that message clearly.

Historically, the ‘Previous Employment’ section of a resume would have the employer’s location. Alongside the title role. This is an area that can slightly shift in design to highlight the location of remote work.  Here are a few suggestions:

List the organization’s corporate location using a city/state format. Then, in the first sentence, note that the work is performed remotely.

Secondly, skip city/state altogether in the formatting and note that the work was performed remotely in the first sentence.

Another option is to list “Remote Work” in place of city/state.

For those with extensive remote experience consider separating home-office jobs into their own “Remote Work Experience” section. This has the advantage of increasing confidence in hiring managers. When they see a list of previous employers who have trusted you to telecommute, that speaks volumes for your abilities to perform well.

Just be sure you don’t distract from your best qualifications by inadvertently hiding some relevant non-remote experience in a lower section.

2. Talk up the Details.

Outline your previous job tasks and accomplishments. Deliberately detail how they were successfully performed remotely. The goal of really strong resumes is to tell your story. The proof is in the details!

For instance, an effective presentation of a customer service position might read something like, “Attended to 50+ customer inquiries each day through the company’s website from a dedicated coworking space with a high-speed Internet connection.”

Or for a sales role, perhaps include a statement such as, “Recognized by management as the top performer for the 2019 fiscal year for converting more cold calls into billable accounts than any other remote worker.”

3. Focus on Skills.

When work is being performed remotely, the skills section of your resume must make an impact.  While every good employee is strong as a self-starter, great communicators, and champions of time management, remote workers need to show this in spotlight style focus.

When discussing your skills, look at how they particularly fit into the remote work ecosystem. Good communicators, for instance, may want to mention their comfort using video conferencing, chat platforms, and instant messaging to stay in touch with others on the remote team.

Strong collaborators could talk about using shared documents strategies and scheduled daily check-ins to accomplish company goals and stay on target while off-site.

Always remember that your resume is to get a foot in the door.  It is meant to tell your story in a punchy and concise format that presents yourself as a solid candidate for continued remote work successes.  

Chances are if a company is hiring for a remote role, then they are perfectly aware of what challenges and successes are possible. Let them know you are a valuable addition to working from any location!

Need to get ready for job search success?  Our team at PWU is here to help.

We offer Resume updates, Cover Letters, LinkedIn Optimization, Recruiter Services, and Professional Career Coaching.

Book a free 15-min consult here https://calendly.com/powerwritersusa-ca

6 Quality Interview Questions

6 quality interview questions

The key to getting a great job offer is portraying an authentic, positive and lasting impression. Whether you’re a seasoned employee or just getting started, these 6 quality interview questions can help the process.

With a professional resume, this is achieved in the first point of contact.  In addition to this, you’ve got to nail the job interview. Asking insightful questions during a job interview demonstrates professionalism, thoughtfulness, and commitment.

That being said, candidates can get lost when it comes to asking the right sort of questions. This blunder shows either a lack of preparation or the stress of the interview. Neither of which leaves a positive impression. 

Like much of life, the failsafe is to be present during the entire interview. Presence shows confidence. Additionally, the best interview questions are oftentimes the ones asked naturally from engagement in the conversation. 

6 Quality Interview Questions

1. What is the history of this position?

It’s valuable to ask about the history of the role. In this case, the answer is useful to know what environment you’re entering.   Furthermore, it shows forethought and attentive care for the position. 

Perhaps this opening was recently created to support company growth. In which case, ask a follow-up question about who owned the responsibilities up to this point, and how the duties will be transitioned.

If you are interviewing for a position left vacant by someone’s departure, get a sense of what happened.

  • Why did the predecessor leave the job?
  • Where they promoted or internally transferred?

If the predecessor was internally repositioned, ask about direct training potential.

2. How does this position support management and serve direct reports?

Certainly, the answers to this question will help you gain insight into the position and how it fits the framework of the company as a whole.

  • Who is your support?
  • Who will you supervise and guide?

Consequently, understanding this will offer a glimpse of what skills are critical for your success.

3. In the first 6 months, what accomplishments would you like from me?

This targetted question shows your commitment to adding value and delivering on expectations. It’s one thing to understand routine tasks and responsibilities, it’s yet another to fully understand expectations.

Altogether, an interview has a singular goal. To demonstrate your fit for the position.  Inquiring about expectations directly speaks to this goal.

4. Which part of the position has the steepest learning curve? What can I do in order to get up to speed quickly?

For some jobs, learning the technology or the internal company procedures is the most challenging aspect of coming on board. For others, it is about understanding the human network. Therefore, guidance on how to speed up the learning process can give you a significant advantage.

5. How is the feedback process structured?

Feedback is how humans improve. To excel in a new role, you’re going to need analysis as a way of marking the perimeter of success. 

Does this company limit its feedback cycle to the annual reviews? Does the hiring manager make it a priority to deliver just-in-time acknowledgment and suggestions for improvement?

As a result, asking these questions represents your intent to learn and grow with the role.

6. What opportunities will I have to learn and grow?

Does the company offer formal or informal mentoring and coaching? Does it invest in continued education or professional training?

Great companies want to hire people who are dedicated to personal and professional growth. Show your hiring manager that continued development is important to you.

Close the interview on a high note.

As a bonus, there are several questions one must never ask during an interview. 

Asking about money, raises and promotions are taboo and can show yourself as arrogant and self-serving. 

Stay away from company gossip. It matters not what your friends, friend says about the company politics or a piece of news read in a local paper, keep your head in the game of professionalism and acknowledge the interview as an opportunity. 

The goal is to end the interview in a powerful and impactful way. For this reason, maintaining professionalism, acting authentically and these 6 quality interview questions are all part of the equation of your success.

4 Career Benefits of the Holiday Season

4 career benefits of the holiday season

The holidays are just around the corner and with them are a much-needed break. For many, especially if you’ve recently started a new job, it’s tempting to skip the holiday downtime for fear it will reflect badly on your productivity. Truly though, with a bit of planning and heart, these 4 holiday season career benefits

1. Taking breaks improves productivity

It’s easy to believe that working late and not taking time off means you will get more work done. However, recent research has found that when working long hours, employees lose creativity while also find it hard to maintain the same intensity level in their work. So, by working yourself too hard, it could actually be detrimental to the quality of your work.

A better strategy is to budget your time around daily, weekly, monthly tasks.

Especially if you’re seeking to maximize the career benefits of the holiday season.

To help manage the workload try assembling a plan.  Take early stock of all high-level tasks that must be finished before your break.  Write these into your schedule and tag them for importance.  This is your mandatory list.

Secondly, form a list of mid-level tasks.  These are the non-immediate-but-overall-important tasks that will greatly benefit current and upcoming workflows.

Lastly, write yourself a bonus list. I find this one the most fun to write.  These are the tasks that if you got to them, it would be considered stepping ahead of your goals. Be specific here to help guide the process.

What small elements would boost your current progress to the next level?

These 3 lists combined will not only gain you traction on the current momentum, but they’ll also greatly ease your mind when away from the office.

2. You’ll be healthier

If you don’t take the time off to relax and unwind, you are putting yourself at risk of becoming overly stressed. We all know stress has negative implications for your health with outcomes such as high blood pressure, heart disease, and depression.

It’s important to look after yourself, as well as your workload. 

With an increase in spending and pressure of family, it can be easy to lose focus on your self-care needs at this time of year. 

Now is a great time to use those massage gift certificates or max out the annual health benefits package.  Book the acupuncture, check-in with the chiropractor, make the time for a little pampering.

3. Quality time with loved ones

Chances are that if you’re working long hours, you don’t get to spend as much time with your loved ones as you’d like to.

By taking this annual leave from work, you set time aside to connect and appreciate, whether it be at home or on a trip together. Spending time with your friends and family may be just what you need to unwind and improve your mood after a stressful period at work.

4. Work-Life balance is important

If a good work-life balance is not met in your job, it’s likely that you will start to build negative feelings towards work or your employer. In order to be happy at work and maintain the drive to work to the best of your ability, it’s important for you to balance work and your personal life.

There is so much to do and see in the world, which just isn’t going to happen from the confines of your office. Take a break and experience new things, or you may regret it later.

If you’ve been meaning to take up a new hobby, this could be your chance to give it a go and you never know, it may even open doors to new opportunities in the future. Step away from the computer and go enjoy yourself over the holidays! 

As always, if needed, our team at PWU is here to help. We offer Resume updates, Cover Letters, LinkedIn Optimization and Recruiter Services. Book a free 15-min consult here https://calendly.com/powerwritersusa-ca

The Resume Format Employers Prefer

employer preferred resume formats

Resumes come in many shapes and sizes. When written and presented properly, they are like a key, opening doors of opportunity all along their path. If a resume has a purpose, it is to make an employer interested enough to invite you in for an interview. That thought in mind, it got us thinking about what resume format employers prefer.

Structurally, there are two favored resume formats. Functional and Chronological. That being said, each has its own advantages depending on individual needs.

Below we share details on both these formats and how they affect your job search process.

Functional Resumes – Highlight Abilities

The goal of a functional resume is to showcase all the strengths and benefits of the individual’s work history. When looking at specific job postings, this style of resume will pull focus to skills and emphasize the depth of these abilities.

As an example, this format is particularly beneficial to people who

  • are beginning their career
  • have gaps in their work history
  • are reentering the workforce
  • have a history of frequent job changes
  • are looking to change career paths

As a rule, functional resumes work well in situations where acquired skills are very transferable. For example, if you have worked as a retail manager, chances are you were responsible for hiring, training, coaching, evaluating and handling employee relations issues.

Start with a summary.

All resumes should start with a strong summary. However, summaries are of extra value in functional formats since this is the beginning of the career success story. Since the aim is to slightly hide the specifics of work history while really shining a spotlight on strengths.

Along with your educational background, you’ll still need to summarize work history, but this is usually done at the bottom of your resume with graceful writing practices.

Chronological Resumes

The chronological resume is the most preferred by employers. It is straightforward and easy to scan. When executed properly, it clearly shows the progression of a career.

As it emphasizes work history, the chronological resume is most effective for candidates with solid experience in their field.  By showcasing your work history front and center, we can immediately show the employer that you have relatable experience.

As mentioned, this type of resume contains an objective and/or summary statement designed to open the conversation on your career story. It is vital to ensure that your dates are all accurate. Check the timeline once and then check it again. There is no room for work history errors.

Both resume formats draw natural attention to educational information along with any specific certifications and additional training.

It all comes down to how you package yourself.

Overall, employers seem to prefer chronological formatting. With this in mind, there’s no need to be discouraged if your story is better told in a functional style. In this case, use the format that shows your experience in the best light. The goal is to get the interview and increase your chance of landing the job you want.

Need help?  Our team at PWU offers Resume updates, Cover Letters, LinkedIn Optimization and Recruiter Services.

Book a free 15-min consult here https://calendly.com/powerwritersusa-ca

Can a Resume Be Multiple Pages?

can a resume be multiple pages

Resume length is always a hot topic in our office. Can a resume be multiple pages? The overall feeling is that if a resume is too long, then it’s at risk of a hiring manager/recruiter not reading the entire document. On the other hand, if the resume is too short, it can come across like a shortage of desired experience.

Without a doubt, there’s no magic resume length that works for everyone.  Every resume should be customized according to each individuals need.

One-Page Resumes

Depending on where you are on the career path, a well written one-page resume can absolutely make the perfect impact. However, with expansive education histories and applicants navigating a dynamic workforce, single-page resumes oftentimes create limitations.

Absolutely, the goal is to create a document that represents skills, accomplishments, and experience.  If the focus is primarily on the appropriate number of pages this can really inhibit one’s ability to effectively market themselves. 

There’s just no advantage to cramming everything on one page. Especially if the end product cluttered and difficult to read.

Situations where one-page resume can be ideal:

  • Fewer than 10 years’ experience
  • Career changes where past experience doesn’t transfer to new goals. 
  • Work history of one or two positions with the same employer

Two-page resumes

But how long should a resume be if you’ve been in the workforce for a while? This is a valid question for those with extensive work histories.

Obviously, with one-page, we’re working with a small space yet aiming to offer a high impact. With a heading at the top and resume sections below including qualifications summary, experience, education, and skills, there’s not a lot of room left over for in-depth accomplishments.

Two pages allow extra space to really showcase the history while targeting your desired job postings. 

Just remember, you do want page-two to see the light of day! If the resume length extends to two pages, be sure to include the most compelling information on the first page.

Three pages or longer

While three pages may seem like you’re entering novella territory, this resume length is oftentimes necessary for high-level professionals.

To keep it concise, write with the employer’s needs and wants in mind.

In addition to this, we recommend you take inventory of why you need a longer format. As well as that, we need to allow for several adjustments before going to multiple pages.

The aim is to build on quality versus quantity.

First to consider is letting go of early career experiences that don’t market to current goals. A resume should not be an obituary of one’s career. It should tell a detailed story highlighting the specifics of your job search.

The ideal resume length depends on you

Are you a student or new graduate with qualifications that don’t quite fit on one page? Try two pages. Are you a CEO with a penchant for getting to the point? Try a one-page resume. The rule is there is no rule.

Resume Goals: Craft an easy to read document that consists of relevant content with a clear and consistent theme. Aim to distinguish from the competition by portraying current and detailed information.  Target keyword optimization to meet ATS approvals.

If all of these factors can be positively addressed on one page, so be it. But if it takes two pages—or more—to address each factor, that’s fine too.

Finally, don’t sweat it. If all this overwhelms you, our team of professional resume writers has just what you need.  Reach out for a free resume review and consultation. We offer Resume updates, Cover Letters, LinkedIn Profile Optimization, Coaching and Recruitment services. 

Connect with us here for a free 15-minute consultation. https://calendly.com/powerwritersusa-ca

Why Resumes Must Be ATS Compatible

why resumes must be ats friendly

To have the best results on your job search, we took a look into why resumes must be ATS compatible. Applicant Tracking Systems, you’ve heard of them, probably even had a resume (or many) scanned by them.

While the task of job searching has changed dramatically over the years, fortune now favors the strategized resume and digital communication channels.

OLD WAYS: A company posts an ad and receives 100 applicants. 

HR then spends an entire day sorting through all these resumes to select a handful of potential interviewees.

NEW WAYS: A company posts an ad and receives 100 applicants. 

Files are auto-loaded into ATS software. Then scanned and sorted according to keywords, experience, and education. Depending on the company, resumes deemed fit for interview are then forwarded either directly to HR Departments or Corporate Recruiters.

All This Before The Document Is Ever Seen By Human Eyes.

The system itself operates in a hierarchy. High ranks are awarded to resumes that check the most automated boxes. This means that no matter how qualified you are if your resume is not ATS friendly, it is very likely you will never be invited to discuss your qualifications in an interview.

How to play the game.

First off, the overall use of Applicant Tracking Systems has increased dramatically in the last few years. According to Zipjobs, 95% of large companies use ATS for all hiring purposes. And if you’re applying within a mid-sized company, you’re looking at a 50/50 chance that your resume will make an ATS connection.

large and mid size companies use applicant tracking systems

Corporate Recruiters.

Recruiters use applicant tracking systems as a tool to stay organized and speed up their placements. In fact, once again referring to ZipJob, some stats show up to 75% of recruiters are using applicant tracking software. Of that percentage, 94% believe the software improves their hiring efficiencies.

All Credentials Must Be In a Machine-Readable Format.

A few resume focus points are listed below:

  • Keyword Usage
  • Basic Formats
  • File Type
  • Organized Sections
  • Professional Font
  • Spelling and Grammer
  • Correct File Name

If you’re looking for more specific ATS resume tips, check out our LinkedIn article on 8 Tips To Beat Applicant Tracking Systems.

Want the big picture?

Take a look at these stats! This graphic really shows what your resume is up against when you apply for a job.

If all this overwhelms you…

Remember, you can always hire a professional. Whether you’re needing a Resume update, Cover Letter, Recruitment Services or LinkedIn Profile Optimization, our team at PWU has what you need. Feel free to connect if you have any questions.

Follow the link for a free resume review and consultation. https://calendly.com/powerwritersusa-ca

Do I Need Multiple Versions Of My Resume?

It’s a common question.  Do I need multiple versions of my resume? 

This is an important issue to discuss because a lot of professionals tend to develop a background in at least three, or even more, thematic work areas as time and their careers progress. In this article, we show both sides of the equation and the reasoning behind them. 

Spoiler alert:  The short answer is no but let’s discuss all angles.

In modern business practices, job seekers develop a wide range of skills and experiences. It is competitive out there and staying ahead of the game requires diversification. For example, some job applicants have worked in human resources, communications, and event planning. 

“The quote I got from XYZ Resume Writers which says I need 3 different resumes and to focus on one specialization to keep the resume simple. Do I really need multiple versions of my resume?”

This perspective and business model is, more times than not, a reflection of the individual writer’s underdeveloped skill set.  It takes finesse to really shape the context of a work history into a professional format with high success rates.

So, can HR, Communications, and Event Planning all be covered in a single resume? 

We believe in a resounding YES. A professional resume writer with extensive years of experience can formulate diverse history into a keyword-rich resume that exceeds expectations.

It’s not what you’ve done in the past, but rather the direction you plan to go next.

There are always transferable skills that help ease the transition and bridge roles.

A written format that highlights all the skills acquired in these roles and draws a bigger picture directed towards the roles you are aiming for. 

Without the resume reading as cluttered and indigestible to the reader’s eye.

professional resume writer uses keywords for success

It’s about streamlining without losing focus on keywords. It’s about representing your assets with varying themes and keeping it tidy.

Plus, it is time-consuming to keep modifying a major chunk of your resume just to highlight focus. Why pay a writer to create a product which you then have to babysit and micro manage?

All this is assuming you are maintaining your current career path. 

Now, if you’re jumping entire industries or career fields then, yes, perhaps it may be necessary to have more than one resume in your toolkit.

For example, you started out as a roofer and then became a builder and later moved into sales of roofing products. As part of your role, you were very involved in a new software implementation and you’ve decided to go into IT. That sort of transition requires a finely-tuned eye to keep the right content, and minimize or eliminate the (less) valuable content…. relating directly to how the resume performs for you.

Additionally, If there’s too much going on it can be difficult for recruiters to judge whether you are actually good at the role they want you to perform. Again, a really strong resume writer will help direct the keywords and content to be heavy in the direction you want to go.

That being said, if you are looking to change career paths, Power Writers USA is here to help reshape your resume for success across your entire search. Feel free to connect with us for a free consultation and resume review.

Remember, the name of the game is algorithms and ATS filters, which is everybody’s challenge right now.  The past few years, formatting styles have changed and with that in mind, we’d love to take a look at what specifics points our team can do to improve the impact your resume makes across all your ideal job prospects.

6 Universal Rules for Resume Writing

Resume Writing

This is a great article to read if you are considering writing your own resume.  Please feel free to reach out to us if you have any questions, we are here to help you!

Original article click here.

For busy hiring managers, your resume provides a snapshot of your career and is often the determining factor in whether you land an interview. If job search is a journey, a stellar resume is your passport.

The fundamental principles of resume writing have remained constant for generations, but evolving technologies mean more aspects of the application and hiring processes take place online than ever before. It’s up to you to stay informed of modern best practices and really put your resume to work for you.

If you’re getting ready for your next career move, keep these six universal rules in mind as you create or brush up your resume.

1. Cover all the basics

The goal of a resume is to best represent your relevant skills and accomplishments, and there are several ways to do that successfully. That said, every resume requires these basic elements:

  • Relevant educational degrees or certifications. The importance of your educational background will vary based on the job or industry you’re interested in.
  • Relevant work and volunteer experience. Most people choose to list their experience beginning with their most recent job. Don’t include everything you did in your past jobs. Instead, focus on achievements over responsibilities.
  • Contact information. Your full name, the city where you live, your email address and phone number. Because this personal information is sensitive, you should be cautious about who you share your resume with. Read over these guidelines for a safe job search to protect yourself.
  • Relevant skills and your level of mastery (for example, “conversational Spanish” or “familiar with Microsoft Excel” vs. “fluent in Spanish” or “expert at Microsoft Excel”).

2. Explore other resumes for inspiration

Search the Indeed Resume database for the job title, industry, or company that you’re thinking about and see how others present their backgrounds and skill sets. This is a great way to uncover stronger ways to describe your experience or to avoid overused words.

You can also get a sense of the internal language used within a particular industry or company. You might have experience that isn’t directly related but is still highly relevant to the position you’re applying for, and you want to include it in your resume. Someone else’s resume might feature a similar history and offer an example of how to frame this experience in a compelling way.

3. Use as few words as possible

Employers need to quickly understand your work experience. Format your experience as a list of short, scannable statements, rather than writing out dense paragraphs. For example:

Too wordy: Applied expert budget management skills to achieve a 20% reduction in departmental expenses through diligent research, identifying significant inefficiencies.

More concise: Achieved 20% departmental cost savings by eliminating inefficiencies.

The typical resume is two pages maximum, so make sure all the information you’ve included is essential. If you can’t decide what is essential, ask yourself if what you’re including is relevant to what the employer is asking for in the job description.

It’s also important to consider the kind of work you truly want to be hired to do. In other words, don’t include past experience for tasks you strongly dislike doing. Keep the experiences that you want to keep building on and match what the employer is looking for—this meets the definition of essential information to include on your resume.

4. Quantify your accomplishments whenever possible

Numbers and data bring your work experience to life and help hiring managers envision the potential impact you could have in their organization. When you can, back up your achievements with real data to boost your credibility and add informative detail to your resume. For example:

Unquantified: Improved lead generation through strategic content marketing initiatives.

Quantified: Achieved 180% year-over-year lead growth through strategic content marketing initiatives.

5. Use keywords that employers are using in their job descriptions

Hiring managers want to see that you can speak their language and know the lingo of their industry. When they see their own keywords mirrored back to them in your resume, it reinforces the idea that you’re a strong candidate for the role. And if your resume will be posted to an online database like Indeed Resume, the right keywords are critical to getting found by employers.

To research keywords commonly used in job postings, explore Indeed Job Category Trends and select your industry. Here you can view top keyword searches and top job titles by month.

6. Proofread several times to catch typos and misspellings

Unfortunately, a single typographical or spelling error is sometimes enough to get your resume discarded early in the game. Review your resume multiple times, doing a thorough line-by-line, word-by-word edit. Reading content backwards—awkward and time-consuming though it may be—is a great way to catch minor mistakes that you might otherwise miss. And an outside perspective is always a good idea. Ask a friend, mentor, or family member to review your resume for you before you begin submitting it to employers.

A strong resume can streamline your job search process, helping you showcase your strengths and get one step closer to your dream job. With some diligent work up front—and by adhering to these six rules—you can turn this fundamental job search document into one of your strongest professional assets.

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Power Writers USA wants to know what you think of this, and other blog articles we post.  Your career change is unique and PWU is here to help you along the way with Resume Writing Services, Cover Letter Writing, CV’s, LinkedIn Profiles Updates, and more.  Contact us now for a free consultation and resume evaluation!

3 Key Differences Between a Curriculum Vitae (CV) and a Resume

Resume or CV

Ever wonder what the differences are between a resume and a CV?  Now you don’t have to!  This quick to read article breaks down the 3 main differences and shares when it is appropriate to use either format.

Original article click here.

A curriculum vitae (also known as a CV) and a resume both reflect a person’s skills and experience, but they are vastly different documents. Here are three important distinctions between the two.

Length of Resumes and CVs

Resumes are typically one or two pages long, depending on how much experience a candidate has. To keep a resume to one or two pages in length, it is necessary to omit older positions and details as time goes on. On the other hand, a curriculum vitae grows longer over time as new information and accomplishments are added. A curriculum vitae can be two pages long, or it can be upwards of a dozen. There are a couple of reasons for the difference in length. One is that resumes often use short phrases and bullet-point formats, while a curriculum vitae goes into more depth.

Typically, education is the first portion of a curriculum vitae, including a listing of all degrees earned or in progress; areas of academic interest; and thesis and dissertation titles and descriptions. With the exception of recent graduates, however, resumes tend to list education last.

A curriculum vitae also includes sections listing teaching and research positions; works published; presentations given; grants, awards, and other honors received; scholarly and professional affiliations; and a list of references.

When to Use a Resume or a CV

A good resume is concise, highlighting select experiences and accomplishments, while a curriculum vitae is instead a complete catalog of a person’s educational and professional background. The purpose of a curriculum vitae is to provide a comprehensive look at a person’s experience, while a resume is intended to provide an at-a-glance overview (one study found that recruiters spend just six seconds reviewing a resume).

Where Resumes and CVs are Most Common

Resumes are more commonly used than curriculum vitae in most fields in the United States. Academia and research are notable exceptions; fellowship and grant applications also sometimes request that applicants submit their curriculum vitae. In most other parts of the world, however, curriculum vitae are used more often than resumes.

Because a resume and a curriculum vitae serve different purposes, job candidates should consider having drafts of both written and ready to use.

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