Do I Need Multiple Versions Of My Resume?

It’s a common question.  Do I need multiple versions of my resume? 

This is an important issue to discuss because a lot of professionals tend to develop a background in at least three, or even more, thematic work areas as time and their careers progress. In this article, we show both sides of the equation and the reasoning behind them. 

Spoiler alert:  The short answer is no but let’s discuss all angles.

In modern business practices, job seekers develop a wide range of skills and experiences. It is competitive out there and staying ahead of the game requires diversification. For example, some job applicants have worked in human resources, communications, and event planning. 

“The quote I got from XYZ Resume Writers which says I need 3 different resumes and to focus on one specialization to keep the resume simple. Do I really need multiple versions of my resume?”

This perspective and business model is, more times than not, a reflection of the individual writer’s underdeveloped skill set.  It takes finesse to really shape the context of a work history into a professional format with high success rates.

So, can HR, Communications, and Event Planning all be covered in a single resume? 

We believe in a resounding YES. A professional resume writer with extensive years of experience can formulate diverse history into a keyword-rich resume that exceeds expectations.

It’s not what you’ve done in the past, but rather the direction you plan to go next.

There are always transferable skills that help ease the transition and bridge roles.

A written format that highlights all the skills acquired in these roles and draws a bigger picture directed towards the roles you are aiming for. 

Without the resume reading as cluttered and indigestible to the reader’s eye.

professional resume writer uses keywords for success

It’s about streamlining without losing focus on keywords. It’s about representing your assets with varying themes and keeping it tidy.

Plus, it is time-consuming to keep modifying a major chunk of your resume just to highlight focus. Why pay a writer to create a product which you then have to babysit and micro manage?

All this is assuming you are maintaining your current career path. 

Now, if you’re jumping entire industries or career fields then, yes, perhaps it may be necessary to have more than one resume in your toolkit.

For example, you started out as a roofer and then became a builder and later moved into sales of roofing products. As part of your role, you were very involved in a new software implementation and you’ve decided to go into IT. That sort of transition requires a finely-tuned eye to keep the right content, and minimize or eliminate the (less) valuable content…. relating directly to how the resume performs for you.

Additionally, If there’s too much going on it can be difficult for recruiters to judge whether you are actually good at the role they want you to perform. Again, a really strong resume writer will help direct the keywords and content to be heavy in the direction you want to go.

That being said, if you are looking to change career paths, Power Writers USA is here to help reshape your resume for success across your entire search. Feel free to connect with us for a free consultation and resume review.

Remember, the name of the game is algorithms and ATS filters, which is everybody’s challenge right now.  The past few years, formatting styles have changed and with that in mind, we’d love to take a look at what specifics points our team can do to improve the impact your resume makes across all your ideal job prospects.

How to Reenter the Job Market

reenter the job market

Without question, to reenter the job market is a challenge that requires strategy to navigate.  No matter the reasoning, whether you’ve started a family, took the time to care for an aging relative, re-invested in yourself by returning to school and finally finished that Master’s Degree or just needed to dedicate a portion of your life to traveling, cracking out the old resume takes patience.

Overcome the Bias.

Recruiters and ATS technology are directed to find the “best talent,” which means they rely on specific indicators to narrow the search. These indicators include recent dates, length of previous employment along with, specific acquired skills and job title. When reentering the job market these indicators are vital.

To help combat any stigma, job seekers need to communicate clearly and focus on the right indicators.

Reenter the Job Market – 4 steps to begin:

  1. Begin updating your skills before you start to look for a job: If you can, start padding your resume a few months before you want to start looking for a job. Volunteer, take an online course, investigate internships — do anything that can help fill gaps and reboot your resume.
  2. Create a resume that is functional rather than chronological: The key is to take the focus off precise employment dates. As professional resume writers, this is second nature to us, however, if you are planning to re-write your resume you’ll want to create headings that show the experiences, successes, and benchmarks and then list your achievements accordingly.
  3. Be courageous. A killer resume is a good first step, however, to land a great job, you gotta nail the interview. If you’re out of practice, consider hiring an interview coach.  These highly skilled professionals are masters of streamlining your dialogue and presence once your foot is in the door.
  4. Be open to new experiences: The reality of reentering the work world is that you might have to make some compromises. Be open to part-time, project or contract work. These short-term jobs provide great experience and contacts that can help you land a job that is a perfect fit for you and all of the experiences you bring to the table.

What if they ask why I was away so long?

emphasize your skills to reenter the job market

If asked about it, discuss your time away briefly. Don’t worry about the details. Emphasize your skills and work ethic rather than your time away. Sell yourself as a blank slate ready to jump in and work hard in a new work environment.

When applying and interviewing, you just have to showcase what you did, where you went, and most importantly, what you learned. It’s about communicating why you made those choices.

As always, we at Power Writers are here if you need a professional resume writer. We offer a free consultation, free resume review and free quotes. Bridging a time gap on your resume is technical, although with our expertise you are certain to enter the job search with a confident and direct resume.

Cover Letters – Do I Need One?

interview questions

You may be wondering if you need a cover letter to compliment your resume when applying for jobs. Are you asking yourself “What difference will it make or can it make?” Let’s discuss when you should send a cover letter and why.

Essentially we should be sending a cover letter along with our resumes to hiring managers unless they specifically say otherwise. Here are the two main reasons:

  1. You can speak directly to your specific qualifications and why these make you the best candidate for the job. Your cover letter allows you to tell employers “who you are” and align your experience and career with their business needs.
  2. The cover letter is used to send a targeted message specific to each job/career for which you are applying.

It is possible to find numerous examples of how to write a cover letter and what the best formatting options are. However, when you work with our professional resume writers you will get the benefit of experience, past client feedback, and current formatting to optimize the ROI. In addition, it can be a struggle to capture who you are on paper. This is why it helps to have a professional writer head the effort.

The window of opportunity to make a strong first impression can be a narrow one. This is especially true when the job market is flooded. The higher the volume of job seekers the more challenging it is to grab the attention of hiring managers. Once you have their attention your cover letter needs to be strong enough to hold it.

Knowing what to put in your cover letter is important, however, knowing what not to add is just as important. In a blog written by Joe Matar titled, 6 Things Your Cover Letter Should Never Say (But Probably Does)

The author talks about the need for your cover letter to be concise. The cover letter is your opportunity to fashion a direct message to the company. Joe Matar explains that saying “a skills and experience section” will not have as much impact compared to telling the story of your career and the value you bring. The same goes for this statement: “I want to work in this industry”. It does not show the employer your passion for their particular company. You want the hiring manager to know you are ready to invest yourself into the very specific needs of their business. Read more of what Joe Matar has to say on this here.

It is also important that you choose the appropriate letter type as well. For example your letter will read differently if you are applying for a specific job posting or you are simply inquiring about job opportunities within that particular company. Hiring managers should not be left guessing about your goals via the cover letter.

Before you start applying for jobs, be sure to invest time in creating a professional cover letter. Make the cover letter concise and direct. This document is an invaluable tool in ushering you through to the interview process in your job search. Use this opportunity to show future employers who you are, and why they need you on their team.


Power Writers USA wants to know what you think of this, and other blog articles we post.  Your career change is unique and PWU is here to help you along the way with Resume Writing Services, Cover Letter Writing, CV’s, LinkedIn Profiles Updates, and more.  Contact us now for a free consultation and resume evaluation!

6 Universal Rules for Resume Writing

Resume Writing

This is a great article to read if you are considering writing your own resume.  Please feel free to reach out to us if you have any questions, we are here to help you!

Original article click here.

For busy hiring managers, your resume provides a snapshot of your career and is often the determining factor in whether you land an interview. If job search is a journey, a stellar resume is your passport.

The fundamental principles of resume writing have remained constant for generations, but evolving technologies mean more aspects of the application and hiring processes take place online than ever before. It’s up to you to stay informed of modern best practices and really put your resume to work for you.

If you’re getting ready for your next career move, keep these six universal rules in mind as you create or brush up your resume.

1. Cover all the basics

The goal of a resume is to best represent your relevant skills and accomplishments, and there are several ways to do that successfully. That said, every resume requires these basic elements:

  • Relevant educational degrees or certifications. The importance of your educational background will vary based on the job or industry you’re interested in.
  • Relevant work and volunteer experience. Most people choose to list their experience beginning with their most recent job. Don’t include everything you did in your past jobs. Instead, focus on achievements over responsibilities.
  • Contact information. Your full name, the city where you live, your email address and phone number. Because this personal information is sensitive, you should be cautious about who you share your resume with. Read over these guidelines for a safe job search to protect yourself.
  • Relevant skills and your level of mastery (for example, “conversational Spanish” or “familiar with Microsoft Excel” vs. “fluent in Spanish” or “expert at Microsoft Excel”).

2. Explore other resumes for inspiration

Search the Indeed Resume database for the job title, industry, or company that you’re thinking about and see how others present their backgrounds and skill sets. This is a great way to uncover stronger ways to describe your experience or to avoid overused words.

You can also get a sense of the internal language used within a particular industry or company. You might have experience that isn’t directly related but is still highly relevant to the position you’re applying for, and you want to include it in your resume. Someone else’s resume might feature a similar history and offer an example of how to frame this experience in a compelling way.

3. Use as few words as possible

Employers need to quickly understand your work experience. Format your experience as a list of short, scannable statements, rather than writing out dense paragraphs. For example:

Too wordy: Applied expert budget management skills to achieve a 20% reduction in departmental expenses through diligent research, identifying significant inefficiencies.

More concise: Achieved 20% departmental cost savings by eliminating inefficiencies.

The typical resume is two pages maximum, so make sure all the information you’ve included is essential. If you can’t decide what is essential, ask yourself if what you’re including is relevant to what the employer is asking for in the job description.

It’s also important to consider the kind of work you truly want to be hired to do. In other words, don’t include past experience for tasks you strongly dislike doing. Keep the experiences that you want to keep building on and match what the employer is looking for—this meets the definition of essential information to include on your resume.

4. Quantify your accomplishments whenever possible

Numbers and data bring your work experience to life and help hiring managers envision the potential impact you could have in their organization. When you can, back up your achievements with real data to boost your credibility and add informative detail to your resume. For example:

Unquantified: Improved lead generation through strategic content marketing initiatives.

Quantified: Achieved 180% year-over-year lead growth through strategic content marketing initiatives.

5. Use keywords that employers are using in their job descriptions

Hiring managers want to see that you can speak their language and know the lingo of their industry. When they see their own keywords mirrored back to them in your resume, it reinforces the idea that you’re a strong candidate for the role. And if your resume will be posted to an online database like Indeed Resume, the right keywords are critical to getting found by employers.

To research keywords commonly used in job postings, explore Indeed Job Category Trends and select your industry. Here you can view top keyword searches and top job titles by month.

6. Proofread several times to catch typos and misspellings

Unfortunately, a single typographical or spelling error is sometimes enough to get your resume discarded early in the game. Review your resume multiple times, doing a thorough line-by-line, word-by-word edit. Reading content backwards—awkward and time-consuming though it may be—is a great way to catch minor mistakes that you might otherwise miss. And an outside perspective is always a good idea. Ask a friend, mentor, or family member to review your resume for you before you begin submitting it to employers.

A strong resume can streamline your job search process, helping you showcase your strengths and get one step closer to your dream job. With some diligent work up front—and by adhering to these six rules—you can turn this fundamental job search document into one of your strongest professional assets.

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Power Writers USA wants to know what you think of this, and other blog articles we post.  Your career change is unique and PWU is here to help you along the way with Resume Writing Services, Cover Letter Writing, CV’s, LinkedIn Profiles Updates, and more.  Contact us now for a free consultation and resume evaluation!

Resume Tips for New Grads

Resume Tips for New Grads

This article is intended to help new grads like yourself optimize the formatting and content of your resume in order to draw the attention of recruiters and hiring managers.  While this article covers some of the basics, there are entire books and workshops dedicated to a comprehensive approach on how to write a resume.  The following sections are in a suggested order of how your resume should flow and what type of content should be included.

Preface

Understand the jobs you are applying for.  Take the time to carefully read each post, possibly several times.  Write down striking keywords or phrases that you can relate your experience or education to so you can incorporate those into your resume.  The better you understand your target positions and what is required, before you start writing your resume, the easier it will be since you will have more of a focus.

Lose the objective

First off, it’s obvious that you want a job.  Replace the outdated objective with a powerful summary of your skills, qualifications, and relevant experience.  Let the reader know right off the handle why you are a good fit for the job.  Keep it action oriented.  Keep “I” out of it; readers also know that the resume is about you.  There is no need for you to take up precious content to remind them that. Include some power words that describe some of your personality characteristics such as Motivated or Results-Oriented.  Keep it short, sweet and to the point.

Core Competencies

Think about what innate or learned skills and abilities you have and how they relate to a job you are applying for.  What are you good at that relates to the position you are applying for?  Read back through the job postings and try to match your strengths with keywords.  List them out in their own section.

Highlight your education

Hopefully you paid attention in class and have something to show for it.  Capitalize on what you studied.  Highlight your education towards the top of the page, below your core competencies.  If you were involved with any academic related extracurricular programs, let it be known.  Unless a minimum GPA is required for a job or unless you have a stellar GPA, feel free to leave it off all together.  Instead, you may want to list out some classes or areas of study that are directly related to the type of position you are after.

Work Experience and Internships

It is really important that when you write this section of your resume that you want to convey the results of your work, not just a job description of the work you performed.  Nothing could be more boring.  Try to keep the content relevant to your target jobs.  There are different ways to format this section, we suggest writing a short paragraph to give some context to the reader and then bulleting some key experience or accomplishments.

Technical skills

Chances are that any job you are going to land will require you to use some form of technology or software.  List what software programs you know, including the ubiquitous Microsoft Office Suite (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook).  In some cases, it may even be appropriate to list various social media.  Your technical skills can be listed out in a relatively short section.

Additional Qualifications

If you need to fill up some space, use this section to highlight some other key reasons you are a good fit for a job position.  You can include life experiences, other skills that may not have been listed in your core competencies.  Just make sure you keep it focused towards your target role

Formatting

If this is your first professional job out of college you should have a one-page resume.  It’s pretty much a given that if a hiring manager sees comic sans on a resume that it’s going in the trash. Use a grownup font such as: Times New Roman, Garamond, Cambria, or Calibri.  Also, these are standard fonts that will work on almost any device without having formatting compatibility issues.  Since you are a young professional and probably pretty light on content use a size 12 font, you can go bigger for section heading and certainly for your name in the header.  For additional formatting help you can find templates online for inspiration or use resume building software.

Best of luck!

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Power Writers USA wants to know what you think of this, and other blog articles we post.  Your career change is unique and PWU is here to help you along the way with Resume Writing Services, Cover Letter Writing, CV’s, LinkedIn Profiles Updates, and more.  Contact us now for a free consultation and resume evaluation!

Can a Recruiter Resume Distribution Service Help Your Job Search?

Resume Distribution

The short answer to whether a recruiter resume distribution service can help you is, yes.  The idea behind the service is that your resume will be sent out to hundreds, if not thousands, of eager recruiters whose job it is to find you a new place to work.  They do a lot of the heavy lifting and you get callbacks for interviews.  But there is some strategy behind making the service work its best for you.  Here’s some key points to help you maximize the value and return of engaging with a resume distribution service.

Define your criteria

You will need to define certain criteria such as your target job positions, location, willingness to relocate, etc.  The clearer you are in your ability to define your career goal or idea job, the easier it will be for others to be able to find a match.  By being clear with your intentions it will avoid a lot of confusion and will save everyone, including you, a lot of time and energy.

Write a compelling letter to the recruiter

You will need to introduce yourself to the recruiter when your resume is distributed.  You can do this most effectively with a letter to the recruiter.  In this letter you need to convey a compelling reason why the recruiter should take their time to work with you and help find you a job, along with what key values you can offer a hiring organization. Your recruiter letter similar to a cover letter but doesn’t necessarily need to be as full of information; this is a high-level, introductory letter that gets the recruiter excited about learning more about you and to help you land a job.  Keep it short and sweet, and please, put your contact information on the letter!

Follow up for success

Depending on the service you use, you may be provided with a list of all the recruiters, or recruiting agencies, that your resume was sent to.  Start making calls!  Set a goal for yourself to call a certain number of recruiters each day.  This step is critical to making the right connections.  Start a dialogue with the recruiters you speak with, ask them questions, tell them your goals, and work with them to get to know you better.  This will serve you well.

With a clear trajectory, the right attitude, the willingness to put in your time and network with the recruiters you sent your resume to, you will find that a recruiter resume distribution service will be a useful service in your job search.  Your job search will be opened up to opportunities you hadn’t heard about, and your ability to land a fitting job in a shorter time-frame will be increased.  Best wishes!

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Power Writers USA wants to know what you think of this, and other blog articles we post.  Your career change is unique and PWU is here to help you along the way with Resume Writing Services, Cover Letter Writing, CV’s, LinkedIn Profiles Updates, and more.  Contact us now for a free consultation and resume evaluation!

When should you update your resume?

Update your resume

While there may not be a consensus on how often you should update your resume, we do recommend that should shouldn’t wait too long.  Keeping your resume fresh ensures you are prepared for any professional encounters, or job related changes that may (and frequently do) occur.

A few things to consider:

If there is a promotion opportunity up for grabs at your current job, you can be one of the first to take advantage of the opportunity if you have your resume updated and current.  Being prepared can make a big impression!

Waiting too long in between resume updates may leave you forgetting notable accomplishments that a future recruiter, employer, or hiring manager may be interested in seeing.

Keeping your LinkedIn profile updated, along with your resume, just may catch a recruiter’s eye, which could open the door to new opportunities and higher earning and increased job satisfaction.

Are you networking, giving a presentation, or interfacing with a lot of individuals outside of your immediate work space?  Being prepared with your current resume and updated LinkedIn profile can be a great way to make a formal introduction of yourself to let others know of your career history, areas of expertise, and accomplishments.

If the worst should happen and you are let go from a job, you can start looking immediately.  Not bringing in a paycheck can be stressful enough, no need to compound the stress by rushing to get your resume updated.  Being prepared will allow you to get started on your job hunt with your newfound free time.

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Power Writers USA wants to know what you think of this, and other blog articles we post.  Your career change is unique and PWU is here to help you along the way with Resume Writing Services, Cover Letter Writing, CV’s, LinkedIn Profiles Updates, and more.  Contact us now for a free consultation and resume evaluation!

How to know when it’s time to leave your job: 10 indicators

Leave your job

Sometimes the signs are obvious, sometimes you get so caught up in the daily grind that you forget to stop and think about it.  Take a few minutes of your day to read this great article and decide for yourself if it’s time to leave your job.

Original article click here.

If you’re unhappy with your current job, it may be time to consider these 10 important factors that indicate a bigger change is needed. When is it time to leave your job?

Thinking about leaving your job and actually doing it are two very different things.  While everybody has some bad days at work, you need to pay attention to symptoms like regular sleep disruption, constant fear of termination, physical and/or emotional illness, alcohol and drug use to cope, and chronic unhappiness.  If you are experiencing even one of these, you probably should consider a job change NOW.  Take a look at the following specific indicators and see which ones resonate strongly with YOU:

1.  You are bored, stale, and stuck.

Your alarm clock rings in the morning, and you push the snooze button twice.  You groan when you think about facing the day.  Once at work, you watch the clock and give in to every distraction that comes your way.

2.  You no longer support the organization’s mission, philosophy, and/or culture.

You find that you are trying to convince yourself that you can still work for this company despite the recent mission shift, growing philosophic differences, and/or unwanted culture changes.  You tell yourself that the misalignment doesn’t really matter, yet you feel like a fish out of water every day.

3.  You conclude that you are not well suited for your job.

You have the right skills, but you don’t like the work.  Although people regularly compliment your expertise and productivity, they have no idea how drained you feel while working to reach your goals.  You are tired of smiling and pretending that all is well.

4.  Your professional growth has stagnated where you are.

Your boss doesn’t offer you development opportunities such as attending conferences and seminars, signing up for online webinar trainings, or registering for college courses.  Further, your boss doesn’t take the time to invest in you through mentoring and coaching.

5.  You find reasons not to expand your skill set.

Although you realize that you could do an even better job if you learned an additional skill, you make excuses for choosing to get by with the skills you already have.  You look for work-arounds, dodge situations that require the needed skill, and/or tell yourself that you lack the time to learn something new.

6.  Your morale is low.

You discover that you are simply not motivated.  People ask you why you never smile.  You procrastinate about starting projects.  You only do what is expected and nothing more.

7.  Other people don’t respond favorably to you.

You notice that coworkers avoid you.  When you voice your opinions or provide input to conversations, people seem to resist your contributions.  When they see you in the hallway or in meetings, they ignore you, pretend you don’t exist, or treat you badly.

8.  You resent the work.

While you do your work and submit it on time, you know you harbor a negative attitude about it.  You frequently feel overwhelmed, and you “fight” all the responsibility you shoulder.  You think about how unjust it is that you appear to be carrying a bigger load than many of your peers.

9.  You resist the changes coming down the pike.

As your boss outlines certain departmental or organizational changes slated to go into effect within the next few months, you silently reject them—even if you know they will be positive and beneficial to everyone involved.  You decide that you don’t want to make these changes because they require effort you’d rather not expend.

10. You have stopped making a positive difference and being a positive influence.

You go to work and do your job, but you don’t go out of your way to add noticeable value to relationships, situations, and the overall culture.  You do what is expected of you—nothing more.

If you see yourself in one or several of the above indicators, it’s probably time to take action.  Create an exit plan, set a time frame, and seek support for your big move.  Staying around for another year isn’t going to serve you, your colleagues, or your company.  Face the fact that you are no longer fully engaged, and muster the courage to cut the cord.

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Power Writers USA wants to know what you think of this, and other blog articles we post.  Your career change is unique and PWU is here to help you along the way with Resume Writing Services, Cover Letter Writing, CV’s, LinkedIn Profiles Updates, and more.  Contact us now for a free consultation and resume evaluation!

5 Ways to Woo Hiring Managers During The Interview Process

Interview Advice

Preparation is key to having a successful interview.  Making a strong impression and giving the proper consideration to those who are interviewing you, including hiring managers, will go a long way.  Here are some great tips to help you prepare.   

Original article click here.

 

While it’s easy to think you’re the center of attention during a job search or interview, you’re actually wrong.

Although 92 percent of job seekers fear something about the interview process, hiring managers have a lot of pressure, too. Hiring managers are expected to select candidates who possess strong skills and experience while also making a great cultural fit.

As you prepare for your upcoming job interview, here are five things to keep in mind that will help the hiring manager make a decision in your favor:

1. Think ahead and be prepared.

Landing a job interview is like striking gold. After weeks of searching for jobs, submitting applications, and networking with employers, securing a job interview is a rewarding feeling.

When the interview process begins, the hiring manager may follow up with you before the job interview itself. Whether it’s via phone or email, be prepared for this communication. This initial contact is a chance for the hiring manager to screen you prior to the interview.

If the hiring manager schedules a phone call before your interview, have all of your bases covered. Thoroughly research the company, have your resume in front of you, and a list of references available. You should also have a few questions prepared just in case because this shows the hiring manager you are eager to land the job and will be prepared for the upcoming interview.

2. Relax and be yourself.

During every job interview, hiring managers want to learn about the real you. Sure, while they don’t care about the fact you love watching Netflix on the weekends, they do care about what makes you unique.

When you enter the job interview, think of it as another networking opportunity. The only difference is you need to market your best qualities and skills to the interviewer. Tell the interviewer about your work-related interests, relevant experience, and things you enjoy most about your career.

3. Demonstrate why you love the company.

Hiring managers love talking to candidates who’ve invested their time in getting to know the company and develop a relationship with it. During the interview, explain to the interviewer how you genuinely care about the growth of the company and how you plan to contribute to its success.

Take a look at any unique challenges the organization faces and come up with some solutions to the problem. This shows hiring managers you’ve done your research and you’re enthusiastic about working for their organization.

4. Prove your interpersonal communication skills.

Anyone can say they’re a team player or they are good listeners. However, to help hiring managers make a good decision, you need to be able to prove these interpersonal communication skills.

To prove your interpersonal communication skills, be ready to answer any question regarding your experience working in a team or making decisions. Bring plenty of accomplishment stories relating to your communication skills that demonstrate your success working in a team, too. This will show the hiring manager what you can accomplish and the strength of your communication skills.

5. Follow up with what you learned from the interview.

Every job seeker knows you need to follow up with a thank you letter after the interview. However, to make a sincere first impression, you should share what you learned from the interview in your thank you note. This shows the hiring manager you paid attention to details during the interview and were genuinely invested in the opportunity.

When job seekers understand what hiring managers expect out of a job interview, it can make the interview run more smoothly and work in your favor. Always remember to do your homework on the employer, prepare relevant accomplishment stories, and remember to ask thoughtful questions. This will give you the opportunity to help the hiring manager make a better decision and choose you for the position.

What tips do you have for helping the interviewer during the hiring process?

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Power Writers USA wants to know what you think of this, and other blog articles we post.  Your career change is unique and PWU is here to help you along the way with Resume Writing Services, Cover Letter Writing, CV’s, LinkedIn Profiles Updates, and more.  Contact us now for a free consultation and resume evaluation!

How to Network Your Way to a Job

Networking for a new job

Taking the time to learn how to network effectively is worth the investment.  You will be able to apply your networking skills towards meeting others to develop meaningful business and personal relationships which can lead to new job opportunities and even financial gain.  This article covers some of the basics of how to network your way to a new job.    

Original article click here.

Networking needs to be done consistently throughout a career, but that’s not always feasible in a world of 70-hour workweeks and family commitments. To jumpstart a network that’s out-of-date, start by asking those former colleagues who you have stayed in touch with for the contact information you need.

If that’s not an option, try searching social- and business-networking sites such as LinkedIn and Plaxo to find old connections. Personalize network-invitation requests with a memory the two of you shared or a reminder of who you are. Once you’ve re-established your relationship, you can also view the friends of your connections, and request an introduction to people at companies that interest you.

Next, arrange in-person meetings with these people to build stronger ties. Be mindful of your contact’s time; you might not be the only one asking for help. Ask for 10 minutes to chat, or offer to catch up over coffee or lunch.

If you’ve exhausted your efforts to find people or need to start from scratch, professional associations are a good place to begin. Associations give you access to other professionals who may work for or have contacts within companies you want to join.

Join trade groups in your niche and then look for events they’re hosting that you can attend. These offer the opportunity to network with people who speak your industry language. If you’ve been in a more senior executive position, consider volunteering to speak at industry and trade conferences or offer to serve on committees for professional associations. These are also ideal ways to meet people.

Alumni associations offer another way to make professional connections. Contact your alma mater’s alumni-relations office to gain access to its online member database, which might allow you to search for old friends by name, class or even employer.

Informal networking can also help. If you find yourself standing in line at the bank or grocery store, strike up a conversation with the person behind you. The results may surprise you.

And remember, networking works both ways. Always offer to return any favors your contacts provide and be sure to contact them even at times when you don’t need their support.

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