Career Breaks and The Comeback

Career breaks and the comeback

Career breaks occur for all sorts of reasons.  Some may choose to take a step back in favor of dedicated family time.  Others come by a career break following redundancy in the company.  Perhaps you’ve decided to enjoy different experiences, such as traveling or to rediscover your interests. Whatever the reasoning, here are 6 tips on navigating career breaks and the comeback.

Whatever motives got you there, the time may come when you decide to jump back onto the career ladder.

Getting a job can be daunting enough, but it can be even more unnerving once you’ve taken a break from work. You may feel anxious about starting a new job or you may worry that your skills are a little rusty because a lot has changed since you’ve been away from the workplace.

If you feel you’re in this situation, below are six effective tips to help increase your chances of getting hired following a career break.

Six Tips to The Comeback

1. Assess your situation

Many people make the mistake of jumping straight back into the first job they can find. Firstly, if you’re not sure about a job, the interviewer may sense your uncertainty and will be unlikely to take you further in the hiring process.

Secondly, if you secure a job that isn’t suitable for you, you could even find yourself job hopping frequently before you find the right one. It’s therefore important to take some time to assess your situation first and decide what you want to do. Open your mind and remember, what was right for you before your career break, may not be what the best fit is for you now.

2. Update your resume with your career break.

It’s common for a candidate to believe that a gap in their resume will ruin their career.

However, instead of seeing it as a handicap, see it as something positive that can differentiate you from other candidates. If you haven’t been working for a long period of time, don’t hide it. A break can provide lots of benefits that can make you just as, if not more hireable, even if it’s just been a chance for you to take a step back and re-evaluate your future career.

Add all the new skills you may have developed during your break, and explain how these can relate to the job you’re now applying for. 

For example:

Did you take a diploma course specializing in new technology?

Did you do volunteer work and develop your leadership skills, which will help you to lead a team more effectively? 

Or perhaps traveling the world helped to give you a much-needed confidence boost?

3. Network

When looking for your first job after a career break, don’t forget to use your existing connections. Spend some time reaching out to your previous colleagues, clients, friends, and family. Let them know that you’re seeking a new position.

They may have the perfect job for you or be able to point you in the right direction. This is also a good opportunity to prepare any potential references that could support your new job applications.

4. Be prepared for your interview

Before you attend your first interview, make sure you’re prepared to answer questions about your career break. You may be asked why you have a career gap and what you did with your time. Honesty is the first step. Make it clear what you did during your break and why you decided it was the right thing for you to do.

You could tailor your answers to demonstrate how your break will benefit the role you are now applying for. Think critically about some of the concerns an interviewer may have. They may wonder whether you’re ready to get back on the career ladder for example. In this case, explain why you have decided to re-join the workforce, whilst emphasizing your passion, drive, and focus.

5. Look for career returner programs

As well as using job boards to search for jobs, research the various career returner programs that may be available. Deloitte is just one example of an organization that runs this kind of scheme. Their return to work program lasts for 20 weeks and is aimed at men and women who have taken a career break. Whether the break has been for family or other reasons, the scheme provides tailored support and experience to help you readjust to being back at work.

JP Morgan is another business offering a similar scheme. Their global ReEntry Program provides networking and mentorship opportunities to senior executives who are looking to re-join corporate life after taking a career break.

6. Be confident

Whether you’ve been away from work for 12 months or 2 years, getting back into the hiring pool can be nerve-racking. However, the most important thing is that you remain confident in your abilities.

Without confidence, you can easily undervalue what you can offer an employer. Write down your skills and strengths on a piece of paper. Refer to this during your job search, to help give you a boost of energy.

If you’re uncertain, ask friends and family to share their feedback on where your strengths lie. They may offer some suggestions that you had not previously considered.

If you’re concerned that your skills are no longer up-to-date, take a refresher course. Make sure you do your research too. Look at the employer’s website and social media channels.

You should also look at their competitors, read the latest industry news and research industry trends. Knowing you have all the information you need, will help you to be much more confident, especially during interviews.

Everyone has their own career path

Taking a career break is more common than you may think, despite the stigma that is sometimes attached behind how potential candidates will fill that void. Everyone has different career ladders they climb at their own pace depending on what their goals are in life.

So if you’re feeling apprehensive about jumping back into the workforce after a career break, remember these tips to put you on the right path with renewed confidence.

Need to get ready for job search success?  Our team at PWU is here to help.

We offer Resume updates, Cover Letters, LinkedIn Optimization, Recruiter Services, and Professional Career Coaching.

Book a free 15-min consult here https://calendly.com/powerwritersusa-ca

4 Effective Ways to Deal With a Layoff

Dealing with a layoff

It’s important to stay positive if you are dealt a layoff.  There is not much sense spending your resources worrying.  Instead, take time to handle your business, and read this article and others like it to learn how you can make the most of the situation.  This may be a blessing in disguise.

Original article click here.

4 Effective Ways to Deal With a Layoff

You walk into your office on a nice Friday feeling hopeful and optimistic about the day ahead. Suddenly, you get called into the boss’s room for a “little talk”, and then it happens! You have been laid off by your company, and you see nothing but doom written all over your future.

This scenario has been a reality for many. Getting laid off without prior notice is a frightening prospect. The very thought of it makes our hearts skip a bit. It’s nothing personal though (well, most of the time), companies simply choose this as an easy way out whenever their economies start going south.

While the whole idea of unemployment is stressful and affects the self-esteem of a person and deteriorates their social status, but here are four ways to help you cope better after getting laid off, should you find yourself in this unfortunate position.

Check your emotions

A layoff can be traumatic in itself, and in the case of a sudden layoff, you feel all the more sad and disappointed. However, the workplace is definitely not a good place to express these emotions. No matter what the emotional status might be, don’t go about burning bridges inside your workplace as your actions can be misinterpreted or misunderstood. If you need to vent, do it in front of family and friends.

‘Reframe’ your career

Reframing basically involves taking a negative situation and turning it around to see it from a positive perspective. Being laid off is the perfect time to regroup and reframe your life and career. Take time to reassess your career choices to find out if you really are on the right path. A layoff might just prove to be right for you. It can help you deal with a complicated situation as well as act as a one way ticket out of a dead job.

Go job hunting

After the reassessment process, it’s time for you to dust off your ‘interview wear’ and go job hunting. Keep a tab on the classifieds to check out what kind of jobs are available for you. Yes, getting back into the market is going to be a little weird, but make use of all those networks that you have created to find out what employers are looking for. Many people use a layoff as a reason to pursue their ‘dream jobs’ or a passion that they always wanted to take up.

Reconnect with your network

This is probably the best time to update your LinkedIn profile and start networking again. Start building a larger network outside of your current employer. Seek professional help from your previous mentors and bosses for endorsements and recommendations. Do not forget that a lay off isn’t something personal – often, the employers feel equally bad while letting you go, hence they wouldn’t mind you asking for help. Obviously, you won’t be able to remain in their good books if you burn bridges in the first place.

An unprecedented unemployment can be a bad road block in the path of your professional career. However, expanding your horizons and broadening your mind can help you to look at it from a positive perspective. And who knows? You might make a comeback that’s better than ever!

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Power Writers USA wants to know what you think of this, and other blog articles we post.  Your career change is unique and PWUSA is here to help you along the way with Resume Writing Services, Cover Letter Writing, CV’s, LinkedIn Profiles Updates, and more.  Contact us now for a free consultation and resume evaluation!