How to Maximize ROI on LinkedIn Profiles

stop under utilizing linkedin

LinkedIn maintains the largest business professional social network and is the prime route recruiters travel to finding talent. However, from what we’ve seen, many clients need help to know how to maximize ROI on LinkedIn profiles.

Sure, it’s a quick and easy way to reconnect with a co-worker from way back when or an old college friend, but LinkedIn is also a powerful tool for lead generation, market research, and global networking.

To maximize ROI on LinkedIn Profiles, learn about LinkedIn’s little-known and advanced features to help you unlock its potential to the greatest extent possible.

Before you spend money on premium accounts or paid marketing.

Be specific on how you plan to use LinkedIn. For example, are you:

  • expanding your network,
  • promoting your business,
  • contributing to a discussion,
  • or publishing your own content specific to your expertise.

If you’re going to contribute, then put thought into the subject and truly contribute.  The same thing goes for expanding your network or promoting your business. 

To get more out of your LinkedIn account, the simplest thing you can do is to increase your participation and choose your focus. 

linkedin profile optimization resume update

For Owners Of B2B Companies

The keys to using LinkedIn as a tool for lead generation are establishing and developing a strong profile. Make sure your profile containing keywords and phrases. You want to draw leads to you and build up your list of connections and followers.

Your goal should be to convey a strong, professional image supportive of your brand identity. Show people what you have to offer, be confident. Own your voice!

The trick is to be authentic, share what matters to you and your company so the right following can find you.

All types of businesses can use LinkedIn as a lead-generation tool by mining competitor connections and searching for senior leaders and decision-makers at companies they are targeting,

Here are some facts and statistics about LinkedIn:

  • Total number of LinkedIn users: 645 million
  • Total number of LinkedIn business pages:  3 million
  • 88 of Fortune 100 companies use LinkedIn’s to search for job candidates
  • 97.3% of staffing professionals overall use LinkedIn as a recruiting tool
  • Profiles with professionals headshots receive 14x more views.
  • Profiles with 5+ skills listed get 17x more profile views.
  • Number of standard skills available to list on LinkedIn 50,000

So, how big is LinkedIn today?

Brenda Bernstein, author of How to Write a Killer LinkedIn Profile writes, “In 2011, 73% of all hires sourced from social media were sourced from LinkedIn as opposed to 20% from Facebook and 7% from Twitter.” 

Today, that number has reached over 90%.

Those are some hefty metrics!  So how optimized is your profile? 

We want to see all or clients operating at top value when it comes to LinkedIn. Whether you’re needing a Resume update, Cover Letter, Recruitment Services or LinkedIn optimization, our team at PWU has what you need.

Follow the link for a free resume review and consultation. https://calendly.com/powerwritersusa-ca

How to Network Your Way to a Job

Networking for a new job

Taking the time to learn how to network effectively is worth the investment.  You will be able to apply your networking skills towards meeting others to develop meaningful business and personal relationships which can lead to new job opportunities and even financial gain.  This article covers some of the basics of how to network your way to a new job.    

Original article click here.

Networking needs to be done consistently throughout a career, but that’s not always feasible in a world of 70-hour workweeks and family commitments. To jumpstart a network that’s out-of-date, start by asking those former colleagues who you have stayed in touch with for the contact information you need.

If that’s not an option, try searching social- and business-networking sites such as LinkedIn and Plaxo to find old connections. Personalize network-invitation requests with a memory the two of you shared or a reminder of who you are. Once you’ve re-established your relationship, you can also view the friends of your connections, and request an introduction to people at companies that interest you.

Next, arrange in-person meetings with these people to build stronger ties. Be mindful of your contact’s time; you might not be the only one asking for help. Ask for 10 minutes to chat, or offer to catch up over coffee or lunch.

If you’ve exhausted your efforts to find people or need to start from scratch, professional associations are a good place to begin. Associations give you access to other professionals who may work for or have contacts within companies you want to join.

Join trade groups in your niche and then look for events they’re hosting that you can attend. These offer the opportunity to network with people who speak your industry language. If you’ve been in a more senior executive position, consider volunteering to speak at industry and trade conferences or offer to serve on committees for professional associations. These are also ideal ways to meet people.

Alumni associations offer another way to make professional connections. Contact your alma mater’s alumni-relations office to gain access to its online member database, which might allow you to search for old friends by name, class or even employer.

Informal networking can also help. If you find yourself standing in line at the bank or grocery store, strike up a conversation with the person behind you. The results may surprise you.

And remember, networking works both ways. Always offer to return any favors your contacts provide and be sure to contact them even at times when you don’t need their support.

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Power Writers USA wants to know what you think of this, and other blog articles we post.  Your career change is unique and PWU is here to help you along the way with Resume Writing Services, Cover Letter Writing, CV’s, LinkedIn Profiles Updates, and more.  Contact us now for a free consultation and resume evaluation!

The Importance of Career Networking

Career Networking

The importance of career networking shouldn’t be discounted when you are in the midst of a job search. In fact, career networking should become a part of your daily work and career-related endeavors.

Your career network should be in place for when you need it, both for job searching and for moving along the career ladder. Since you never know when you might need it, it makes sense to have an active career network, even if you don’t need it today.

What is Career Networking?

Career networking, or “professional” networking, involves using personal, professional, academic or familial contacts to assist with a job search, achieve career goals, or learn more about your field, or another field you’d like to work in.

Networking can be a good way to hear about job opportunities or get an “in” at the company you’d like to work in.

Why Spend Time on Career Networking?

Networking can help you get hired and help you grow your career. LinkedIn reports:

  • 70 percent of people in 2016 were hired at a company where they had a connection.
  • 80 percent of professionals consider professional networking to be important to career success.
  • 35 percent of surveyed professional say that a casual conversation on LinkedIn Messaging has led to a new opportunity.
  • 61 percent of professionals agree that regular online interaction with their professional network can lead to the way in to possible job opportunities.

Who You Can Network With

You might network with:

  • Past or present coworkers, colleagues, managers, supervisors or employees
  • Past or present clients and customers
  • Business associates
  • Alumni of your undergraduate or graduate alma mater
  • Acquaintances you know from your personal life
  • Acquaintances you know through your spouse or your family
  • People from your church, gym, yoga studio, or community organization
  • Past or present teachers or professors
  • Anyone you meet and have a productive, professional conversation about your career path!

 

Top 7 Career Networking Tips

1. Include the right people
Your career network should include anyone who can assist you with a job search or career move. It can include past and present co-workers, bosses, friends with similar interests, colleagues from business associations, alumni from your university, or acquaintances you have met via online networking services. Your network can also include family, neighbors, and anyone who might have a connection that will help.

2. Know what your career network can do for you
Over 80% of job seekers say that their network has helped with their job search. Networking contacts can help with more than job leads. They can provide referrals to or insider information about companies you might be interested in working for. They can provide information on career fields you might want to explore or what the job market is like on the other side of the country. Your network can give you advice on where to look for jobs or review your resume.

3. Keep in touch – work your network
Don’t just contact those who can help when you have just been laid-off from your job or decide you want to look for a new position. Keep in touch with your network regularly – even if it’s just a brief email to say hello and to ask how they are doing. People are more willing to help when they know who you are.

4. Give to get – what can you do for your career network?
Networking shouldn’t be a one-way street. If you come across an interesting article or a relevant job listing, share it with your network. The point of having a career network is to have resources who can help, but you should reciprocate whenever you can.

5. Keep track of your network
Keep track of your personal career network somewhere. Whether it’s electronically or on paper, make sure you know who is who, where they work, and how to get in touch.

6. Network online 
Online job searching networking does work. Sites like LinkedInFacebook, and a variety of other online networking websites can help you get in touch with other networkers at specific companies, with college affiliations or in a certain geographic area. In addition, if you’re a college graduate, your institute may have an alumni career network you can access.

When networking with people you don’t know, make sure that you know what you want. Are you looking for company information? Do you want to know about job opportunities? Be specific in what you ask for.

7. Attend networking events
Networking in person works, too. If you belong to a professional association, attend a meeting or a mixer. You’ll find that many of the participants have the same goals you do and will be glad to exchange business cards. If your college alma mater holds alumni networking events (many schools hold them at locations across the country) be sure to attend. There are many different types of networking events you can attend.

Career Networking Examples

Here are some examples of how career networking can help:

  • Susan noticed a help-wanted ad for a job at a local veterinary clinic. She called a friend who happened to use that vet. Her friend called the vet and recommended Susan. Susan got an interview and got the job. The vet was glad to hire someone who came highly recommended by a good client.
  • John was interested in pursuing a career in medicine. He mentioned his interest to a family friend who happened to be a doctor. The doctor arranged for John to spend a day shadowing him at the hospital and provided an excellent recommendation for medical school.
  • Angela was interested in changing careers and moving from public relations to publishing. Even though she graduated more than a few years ago, she tapped her college career network and came up with a contact at a top New York publishing firm. In addition to being sent new job postings, her resume was hand-delivered to Human Resources when she found a position she wanted to apply for.
  • In casual conversation at the orthodontist’s office, Jeannie, the assistant, just happened to mention to a patient’s mom that she was interested in horses and in a part-time job working with them. The mom had horses and a bunch of contacts. Jeannie had a part-time job working on a local horse farm by the end of the week!.

Why Career Networking Works

As you can see, career networking really does work and it’s importance to have a viable network in place throughout your career and to use your network to your advantage when job searching or exploring career options.

Original article click here.

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Power Writers USA wants to know what you think of this, and other blog articles we post.  Your career change is unique and PWUSA is here to help you along the way with Resume Writing Services, Cover Letter Writing, CV’s, LinkedIn Profiles Updates, and more.  Contact us now for a free consultation and resume evaluation!

6 Networking Tips for Your Job Search

Networking tips for job search

Sometimes the best job offers are only a few handshakes away or a couple degrees of separation from your inner circle.  It’s important to approach networking for a new job with a good strategy.  This article gives some great tips for networking as a part of your job search.

Original article click here.

The biggest mistake people make in networking is focusing on what they want rather than listening to others.

Networking with other professionals in your industry can be beneficial when you’re looking for work. You might meet the hiring manager for a company and hear about an unadvertised position, find a new consulting opportunity, or get some insight into the best way to apply for a position.

The biggest mistake people make in networking is focusing on what they want, rather than on connecting and listening to others. If you want your networking to be truly effective, the goal should be focused on helping others and making memorable connections.

The Importance of Professional Networking

 Anything you can do to stand out against the sea of job-seeking competitors can help you get the job you want. Having the right contacts (made through networking) can get you the inside scoop that can help you tailor your resume for what the company really wants, or can even provide the hiring manager with a good word or two about you. Considering that most jobs come through personal connections, building your network should be a high priority on and off the job search.
Networking for Success

Networking takes work and practice. Here are a few tips to help you make your networking truly successful.

1. Give as much as you get.

When you think, “how can this person help me,” you’ll be disappointed. However, when you are offering help to others, you’ll find them far more open to the idea of helping you down the road. Forming relationships built on trust will help you be the person your contacts think of the next time they can find a way to help you.

 2. Be proactive.
Networking doesn’t just happen. You need to be active in your efforts and make sure you get out and meet people. Start by talking to everyone you meet at business meetups, trade shows, and conferences.
To find upcoming events, pay attention to the newspaper or go online. Sites like meetup.comEventfulEventBrite and LinkedIn Events are all very useful when you need to find places to network.
 3. Develop your networking strategy.
Prepare your elevator speech explaining who you are and what you do, and practice enough that you sound like a natural. Schedule at least two or three events a month, and find groups that you want to join so that you build relationships through the monthly meetings.

Have a stack of business cards ready to hand out. You don’t want to be the person who works the room racing to collect and hand out your cards, though. Save the exchange for when you have a conversation. People can sense greedy networkers who are there to work the room and add as many contacts to their mailing list without permission. Being genuine sells, so be prepared to ask plenty of questions of others, and keep in mind that you’re trying to help them first, not the other way around.

4. Stay positive.

It’s easy to let yourself get down and lose self esteem when you’ve been rejected in the job hunt, and this can affect everything, including your networking skills. Staying positive makes you approachable and memorable. Consider each networking event an opportunity to learn something new or meet someone interesting.

5. Take full advantage of opportunities.

With networking opportunities abounding, make sure you actually attend them. Networking only works if you put yourself out there and to start talking to people. Let your guard down and be aware of what your body language communicates.

 6. Don’t forget social media.
While it’s true that in-person meetings solidify relationships, when it comes to networking, many relationships can either start or flourish through social networking. Use sites like Twitter and Facebook to stay in touch with people you’ve met in person, as well as to network with others, such as people who work at the company you’re interested in.

Honing your networking skills will serve you well throughout your professional career, especially when job searching. Networking takes time and relationships won’t develop overnight, so be patient. By making a point of consistently meeting new people, you will learn from others about your industry, profession, and the companies you’re interested in. You might even find your perfect job you would have never known about otherwise!

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Power Writers USA wants to know what you think of this, and other blog articles we post.  Your career change is unique and PWUSA is here to help you along the way with Resume Writing Services, Cover Letter Writing, CV’s, LinkedIn Profiles Updates, and more.  Contact us now for a free consultation and resume evaluation!