10 Habits That Will Ensure Career Success

Career Success

Whether we like it or not, we spend much of our time working.  Most of us spend over 2,000 hours a year at work.  So if you aren’t happy with your present career or if you are trying to break into a new field, here are 10 essential habits for getting the job you want:

Original article click here.

1. Know your career mission statement

Make sure you are clear about what you want to accomplish with your career.  Say it out loud and claim it. Write down exactly what your mission statement is and post it where you can see it every day.

2. Audit your time

If you go to work every day, write down how you spend your time. Look for things that distract you or keep you from meeting your goals. Take out things that aren’t productive. If you are looking for employment, take a serious look at how you spend your time. How much time do you want to spend each day going to appointments or on the phone? How much do you need to devote to research for job interviews? Being accountable for your time helps you get the most from each minute.

3. Make sure your online brand is accurate

In today’s world, prospective employers, as well as current management, use the internet and social media to track you. So make sure you do the work first. Google your name, make sure your profile and your brand are on point. Delete anything that doesn’t represent who you are in the best possible light.

4. Daily gratitude

Whether you are struggling with a “not so great” job or are looking for that career break, take time for daily gratitude. You can find things that you are thankful for, no matter what the circumstances. This habit will change your attitude about yourself and your career. It is humbling to acknowledge all that you do have.

5. Be flexible

Employers are always looking for team members who will go with the flow and not complain when schedules or duties change. These types of employees are soon on the boss’s radar because they make him or her look good. People who accept changes cheerfully often find they are asked to work more projects and move up faster in the workplace.

6. Do not just seek approval

It is easy to adjust our actions or beliefs as employees if we are looking for the support of management. You may find yourself tempted to give in to particular demands of a prospective employer just to get the job. However, instead of seeking approval, you should focus on the impact your actions make. Will it enhance service for the customer? Do you go the extra mile to meet requirements? Approval is fleeting, but impact shapes policy. So, instead of asking yourself if the boss liked your performance, ask yourself if you did your best. Did you make a lasting impact on some part of the job? If you can say that, you are successful.

7. Arrive 30 minutes early

Like many employees, you may slide into the office just in time, with a minute to spare. Or maybe you plan your commute so that you just make it into your office before the boss. Here’s an easy habit to form: Get to the office 30 minutes before you begin your day. Have time to sit and reflect on your goals for the day. Take inventory of what you need to accomplish and prioritize. You will find that your day will be less chaotic, and employers see this as you taking initiative, to be ready on time and prepared.

8. Reach out often

Even if you already have a job, never stop networking with business friends and contacts. New opportunities are found quicker through word of mouth than any search engine. Keep an accurate, current list of contacts and use all of the social media to reach out and network.

9. Don’t underestimate the benefits of a mentor  

You can never go wrong by seeking guidance from someone who has been working in the field longer than you. Finding someone who can counsel you through challenging aspects of your career is invaluable. Don’t reinvent the wheel, just find out how others in your position have handled situations.

10. You will never finish

There is no perfect pinnacle to any career. There is always room to grow and expand. A career is about a journey, not reaching a certain destination. There will be another opportunity on the horizon. Always remain a student of your chosen field and be ready to grow.

What are you doing to help your career? Are you doing what you love?

 

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Power Writers USA wants to know what you think of this, and other blog articles we post.  Your career change is unique and PWUSA is here to help you along the way with Resume Writing Services, Cover Letter Writing, CV’s, LinkedIn Profiles Updates, and more.  Contact us now for a free consultation and resume evaluation!

Career Advancement – How to Move Up at Work

Career advancement

Having a shot at career advancement may come natural to a select few but for most of us it takes careful preparation and planning.  The more you know the better off you are.  This is a great article to help you move beyond your current position, if you are so inclined.  Of course we are here to help when you need!

Original article click here.

Career advancement, when we discuss it within the context of career development, refers to the upward trajectory of an individual’s  career. One can advance in a single occupation by moving up from an entry-level job to a management position, for instance. This growth may come after one gains experience, completes additional training, earns a degree, or receives certification.

Advancement may also come in the form of a career change from one occupation to a related one that has greater responsibilities.

Usually, the advanced position requires more experience and additional education. One example would be a physical therapy aide who goes to school to become a physical therapy assistant. Another is carpenter who becomes a construction project manager after getting experience and a degree.

Why You Need to Know About Advancement

When you are exploring an occupation, it is a good idea to learn what advancement opportunities are available to people who work in that field. If you are someone who needs new challenges and increasing responsibilities, you will become bored if your career lacks the opportunity to grow. Your boredom will likely lead you to become dissatisfied. Eventually, you will have to make a choice about how to proceed. You can resign yourself to spending your days unhappy with your work, or you can change your career. Making a transition to a new occupation isn’t easy—it takes time, energy, and money—and therefore many people are stuck in a dissatisfying career.

When reading a description of an occupation, look for information about advancement opportunities. You can also conduct informational interviews with people who work in the field about which you are thinking. Choose individuals who have a lot of experience. Ask them how their careers have progressed since they started working.

How did their entry-level jobs differ from what they are doing now? Inquire about what they expect to be doing in the future. Do they have hopes of climbing the corporate ladder or are they worried they are in a dead end job?

Also, ask the people you interview about their aspirations. Not everyone who has the opportunity to advance will take advantage of it. Remember, also, that the presence of the opportunity to move up, doesn’t necessarily mean you will have a boss who will give you the chance to grow. To progress in your job, you may have to find a new job that offers you mobility.

How to Advance at Work

If you are employed in an occupation that offers advancement opportunities and your employer is amenable to promoting from within, there are some things you can do to help things progress. You should:

  • Ask your boss to assign more challenging projects to you. This will let you demonstrate your willingness to take on more responsibility and give you a chance to prove that you can handle it.
  • Regularly check in-house job listings for higher level positions. Make sure you qualify for them before you apply.
  • Offer to help out others, including your boss, with difficult projects. Doing this will show that you are a team player.
  • Ask someone with more experience, for example, your mentor, for advice. She will be able to give you helpful pointers. Getting guidance about matters such as advancement is one of the best reasons to have a mentor, so if you don’t have one, try to establish that relationship as soon as possible.
  • Find out what additional training and certifications can help you advance in your career and then pursue them if you can. Learn about your employer’s tuition reimbursement policy. Your organization may foot the bill for your continuing education.

Is Anything Wrong With Being Happy Where You Are?

Not everyone strives to advance in his career. Some people are happy staying right where they are, and nothing is wrong with you if you feel that way. It doesn’t make you lazy or unmotivated. It is possible to work as hard, or harder, in an entry level positions than in a higher one.

You may know that you aren’t management material and that’s okay.

You should be aware, however, that a lack of desire for career advancement, doesn’t necessarily mean you won’t become bored with your job. If that happens, you can consider making a lateral move within your organization. This involves moving from one position to another with different duties but a similar level of responsibility. Unfortunately, this may mean your salary probably won’t increase either.

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Power Writers USA wants to know what you think of this, and other blog articles we post.  Your career change is unique and PWUSA is here to help you along the way with Resume Writing Services, Cover Letter Writing, CV’s, LinkedIn Profiles Updates, and more.  Contact us now for a free consultation and resume evaluation!

Tips to Successfully Interview for a Job Promotion

Job Promotion

Great article sharing how you can prepare for your job promotion interview, what to do and say during the interview and what to do after your interview.  Best of luck out there!

Original article click here.

Are you being considered for a promotion, but have to interview to get considered for the new job? What’s the best way to handle an interview for a job promotion? What can you expect when you’re interviewing with a company you already work at? How can you ace the interview and get promoted?

What is a Job Promotion Interview?

A job promotion interview is an interview for a promotion or a different job at your current employer.

Many companies require internal candidates to go through a similar hiring process as external candidates for employment.

A job promotion interview is different from a job interview for a new position for several reasons. First, you are already part of the company, and you know what their expectations are. Secondly, every day – before and after the interview – will give you an opportunity to show off your abilities while working in your current position.

In addition, you can use your already established commitment to the company, and your aspirations to grow within it, to your benefit. On the flip side, you still need to go through an interview process and will be compared with other candidates for the job, possibly external as well as internal candidates. In fact, your interview may be tougher than candidates from outside the company, because expectations about what you know and your skills may be higher.

Job Promotion Application Requirements

When applying for a promotion or a lateral job change within the company, employees are expected to apply and interview for the position per company guidelines. Even though you’re already employed at the company, don’t be surprised if you have to resubmit your resume and craft a cover letter for the new position.

In fact, submitting a custom cover letter specific to the new position can be very helpful in landing the job.

Remember, you may be competing with outside candidates, and although you have an advantage in that you already work for the company, that doesn’t mean you should skimp on your job application efforts. Take the time to carefully review and proofread your application materials before you submit them.

Tips to Successfully Interview for a Job Promotion

Here are tips for acing a job promotion interview, so you can be prepared for an opportunity to move up the career ladder.

Before the Job Promotion Interview

Pay Attention to the Hiring Process. When you find out there is a job opportunity you’re interested in, follow the application instructions. Don’t expect to be able to bypass the company’s hiring process to get the job. If the company has rules, they apply.

Prepare for the Interview. Review common interview questions and answers and consider how you would respond, based on your knowledge of the company, your current job and the new position, your skills, and your goals for the future. Review the skills you have that make you qualified for the new job. Also, review typical job promotion interview questions that you may be asked.

Do Your Job Well. Even though you may be moving on, continue to do your current job well, to remind your superiors about what a great employee you are.

Tell Your Boss. If you get selected for an interview, tell your current supervisor so he or she doesn’t hear the news from a third party. Explain why are applying and ask your boss for his or her support.

Prepare For the Promotion. Prepare to pass your current job on to someone else; have all of your ducks in a row. If your goal is to continue moving up in the company, leaving a mess behind can reflect poorly on you. Offer to assist with training and to be available for questions.

During the Job Promotion Interview

Stay Professional. Even though you know the company and you may even know the interviewer, do not lose your professional attitude.

It’s important not to come across as too casual and relaxed. It’s important to show the interviewer that you want the job, and have what it takes to succeed in the new role.

Highlight your strengths. Your strengths may include your familiarity with the position and the company, the success you have had in your current position, and the commitment you feel towards the company to make it as successful as possible.

Remember You Don’t Know Everything. Be prepared to talk about unfamiliar aspects of the position. Do not assume you already know the in’s and out’s. You may get caught off guard.

Don’t Be Over Confident. Do not go to the interview presuming that you “got the job” – an over confident attitude can be damaging.

Ask Questions. If you have questions about the new position, what your role will be, and how you would transition, be sure to ask during the interview. Here are examples of questions to ask the interviewer.

After the Job Promotion Interview

Say Thank You. Write a thank you note to the person that interviewed you. Reiterate your interest in the new position.

Don’t Burn Your Bridges. If you get the promotion, do not burn any bridges. You will be leaving co-workers behind, possibly becoming their superior, treat them with the same respect you did when you were working together. When the promotion is finalized, let your co-workers know that you are moving on. However, if the company is going to send an official announcement, wait until that is sent before sending a personal email message.

Don’t Have Hard Feelings. If you don’t get the job, leave any negative feelings behind and work towards the next promotion opportunity.

Power Writers USA would love to hear your comments and questions about this and other articles we share and post.  Please contact us if you are in need of a resume update, cover letter, LinkedIn profile update, etc.

Moving on Up: How to Ask for a Promotion

Promotion

This is another fantastic article we are sharing about what you need to do to prepare to take that next step and get the job promotion you are after.

Original article click here.

Asking for a promotion ranks high on the list of life’s most anxiety-inducing activities. Putting yourself out there to higher-ups can be intimidating, and competition can be fierce, especially in the current economic climate. And, of course, what if they say no ?

But—it’s also one of the most important things you can do for your career. If you want to move forward in your company or field, promotions are part of the game, and they won’t just be handed to you—you have to work (and ask!) for them.

Ready to take that next step? Here’s what to know before the big conversation.

1. Do Your Homework

The most important part of asking for a promotion is preparing ahead of time. When you make the ask, you’ll need to prove (with specifics) that you’re ready for the next step.

First, you’ll want to emphasize to your manager what you’ve brought to the table so far—it’s a good measure of both your contributions and your future potential. Make a list of all of your accomplishments to use as your talking points. Have you taken on a side project that grew into a new revenue stream? Doubled your sales goals in less than six months? Doing a great job in your position isn’t enough to make your case—you’ll need to show that you’ve gone above and beyond .

Next, identify the specific position you want, and why you’re ready to take it on. If you’re asking to become assistant manager, know what that entails and then demonstrate that you’ll be able to fulfill the position. Want to be a team leader ? Give examples of how you’ve successfully managed smaller projects or groups of people, like coordinating your department’s internship program. Find concrete examples that prove that you’re the right person for the job.

2. Plan the Timing

There’s no “perfect” time to ask for a promotion, but some times are definitely better than others. The most straightforward time to ask is your annual (or semi-annual)review —it’s a built-in opportunity for both you and your manager to discuss how you’ve been doing and where your career is headed. (Just be sure that you’re not asking for a promotion solely because you’re up for review—you still need to demonstrate that you deserve the bump.)

Also consider your position in the company and what’s going on within your department or team. Are people around you leaving or moving up the ranks? Is your department merging with another, or repositioning itself within the company? When there’s a lot of overall change going on, it presents a great opportunity to step up and ask your boss where she sees you fitting in as the organization moves forward.

Finally, don’t be scared off by the dismal economy . Even in these tough times, smart employers understand that their employees are one of their most valuable assets, and they’ll want to retain (and reward) the best of them. You might get a smaller salary bump than people did in years past, but a promotion isn’t just about the money: It’s also about increased responsibilities, and hopefully you’ll be fiscally rewarded when the economy starts to turn around, even if you aren’t now.

3. Ask for the Meeting

If you decide to ask for a promotion when it’s not annual review time, plan ahead before you approach your manager. Send an email requesting a meeting, and make it clear that you’d like to discuss your performance and potential. You don’t want to show up to a meeting and catch your manager off guard—by giving her advance notice, she’ll have time to reflect on your performance and what the company will be able to offer you, position- and raise-wise.

4. Know Your Numbers

One of the biggest career mistakes women make is not negotiating their salary . According to a 2008 Carnegie Mellon study , men are four times more likely to negotiate a first salary than women, and 2.5 times more women than men said they feel “a great deal of apprehension” about negotiation. That’s not a good thing!

You shouldn’t discuss numbers until you’ve actually been offered a promotion, but you should be prepared to have the conversation if it arises. So, do your research and know what you’re worth, both within the company and outside of it. Check out PayScale andSalary.com , and see if you can find out the norms for your industry and company, too.

Then, when negotiation talks begin, don’t sell yourself short—it doesn’t hurt to ask for too much. That’s the nature of the negotiating game: they can always offer you less than what you ask for, but they’ll never offer you more.

5. Follow Up

If you get the promotion, great! Go out and celebrate—you deserve it! But if not, know that it’s not the end of the world, and more importantly, don’t just close the conversation just yet.

Make sure you leave the meeting with an idea of what will happen down the road. If now is not a good time for the department to be offering promotions, ask your boss when you can revisit the conversation. If he or she said no based on your current qualifications, get feedback on steps you can take to gain experience and be considered for a promotion in the future.

Above all, know that if you’re in the right position, your manager will be glad that you’re looking to advance. Nobody ever gets fired for asking for a promotion (trust me!). But if you don’t ask, you’re only hurting yourself.

 

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